Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Science X Newsletter Wednesday, Apr 26

Dear Reader ,

500 multiphysics papers and presentations for download: https://goo.gl/HUr11r

Find inspiration for new design ideas from over 500 papers, posters, and presentations on multiphysics simulation available in this new collection. Get instant access here: https://goo.gl/HUr11r


Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for April 26, 2017:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Physicists design 2-D materials that conduct electricity at almost the speed of light

Sun's eruptions might all have same trigger

Paleontologists identify new 507-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincers

'Iceball' planet discovered through microlensing

Humans in America '115,000 years earlier than thought'

Wind, rain play key role in breeding patterns of migratory tree swallows

Baby whales 'whisper' to mothers to avoid predators: study

TED: Smart machines to recover lost memories, mind your children

Lyrebird to offer tech to copy the voice of anyone

HIPPO's molecular balancing act helps nerves not short circuit

Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI offers greater range of diagnostic and therapeutic applications

Common pesticide damages honey bee's ability to fly

Link discovered between immune system, brain structure and memory

Scientists identify chemical causes of battery 'capacity fade'

Researchers build artificial synapse capable of autonomous learning

Astronomy & Space news

Sun's eruptions might all have same trigger

Large and small scale solar eruptions might all be triggered by a single process, according to new research that leads to better understanding of the Sun's activity.

'Iceball' planet discovered through microlensing

Scientists have discovered a new planet with the mass of Earth, orbiting its star at the same distance that we orbit our sun. The planet is likely far too cold to be habitable for life as we know it, however, because its star is so faint. But the discovery adds to scientists' understanding of the types of planetary systems that exist beyond our own.

'Ageless' silicon throughout Milky Way may indicate a well-mixed galaxy

As galaxies age, some of their basic chemical elements can also show signs of aging. This aging process can be seen as certain atoms "put on a little weight," meaning they change into heavier isotopes—atoms with additional neutrons in their nuclei.

Spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic first

NASA's Cassini spacecraft ventured Wednesday into the never-before-explored region between Saturn and its rings.

China talking with European Space Agency about moon outpost

Representatives of China and the European Space Agency are discussing potential collaboration on a human outpost on the moon and other possible joint endeavors, according to a spokesman for the European agency and Chinese media reports.

NASA balloon mission launches, with goal of breaking flight record

NASA on April 24 launched a football-stadium-sized, super-pressure balloon on a mission that aims to set a record for flight duration while carrying a telescope that scientists at the University of Chicago and around the world will use to study cosmic rays.

Designing the hanging gardens of Mars

NASA is all about solving challenges, and the goal of having a prolonged presence in space, or a colony on Mars or some other world, is full of challenges, including the necessity of growing food. Scientists at Kennedy Advanced Life Support Research are working on the Prototype Lunar/Mars Greenhouse Project to try and meet that challenge.

Detector delivery marks another Euclid milestone

ESA's Euclid mission has passed another important milestone with the delivery of the first three state-of-the art detectors for the Near-Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer instrument.

Sequencing the station: Investigation aims to identify unknown microbes in space

Building on the ability to sequence DNA in space and previous investigations, Genes in Space-3 is a collaboration to prepare, sequence and identify unknown organisms, entirely from space. When NASA astronaut Kate Rubins sequenced DNA aboard the International Space Station in 2016, it was a game changer. That first-ever sequencing of DNA in space was part of the Biomolecule Sequencer investigation.

NASA spacesuits over budget, tight on timeline: audit

The United States is in a hurry to send people to Mars by the 2030s, but a key question remains for these deep space explorers: what will they wear?

From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the future

On the rust-colored north flank of one of Earth's largest volcanoes, a backpack-sized instrument monitors our atmosphere and, at the same time, helps set the stage for possible human exploration of other worlds.

ESA boosting its Argentine link with deep space

Thanks to some high-tech improvements, ESA's radio dish in Argentina will be ready to receive the rising torrent of scientific data beamed back by future missions exploring deep in our Solar System.

Saturn spacecraft toting CU Boulder instrument starts swan song

Toting a $12 million instrument built by the University of Colorado Boulder, NASA's Cassini spacecraft made the first of 22 dives between the rings of Saturn and the gaseous planet today, the beginning of the end for one of NASA's most successful missions ever.

Technology news

TED: Smart machines to recover lost memories, mind your children

Intelligent machines of the future will help restore memory, mind your children, fetch your coffee and even care for aging parents.

Lyrebird to offer tech to copy the voice of anyone

(Tech Xplore)—Technology via an application programming interface can copy any person's voice just from a one-minute audio recording.

Interdisciplinary team works to 4-D print metals and alloys

A team of researchers from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Texas A&M University is collaborating to 4-D print nickel-titanium shape memory alloys.

A simplified fabrication process for high efficiency solar cells

A team of EPFL and CSEM researchers in Neuch√Ętel presents in Nature Energy a new astonishing method of creating crystalline solar cells with electrical contacts at the rear, suppressing all shadowing at the front. Thanks to the new inexpensive approach, the fabrication process is strongly simplified with efficiencies in the laboratory already surpassing 23 percent.

New design tool to enable global roaming smart phones

Wireless communications is a technology that is used every day. Across society, there is a move away from using the internet on desktop computers and towards smartphones, tablets and laptops. Engineers at the University of Bristol have developed a novel radio frequency (RF) design tool that will speed up the design of tuneable wireless devices and will enable smartphones to roam internationally.

A mobile solar-powered recycling plant that turns trash into tiles

(Tech Xplore)—A team of researchers with Miniwiz has developed a mobile recycling plant called the Trashpresso that can be hauled between locations. In addition to its mobility, it's also solar powered, making it useful for communities with limited recycling facilities.

Light can improve perovskite solar cell performance

Publishing in Nature, EPFL scientists show how light affects perovskite film formation in solar cells, which is a critical factor in using them for cost-effective and energy-efficient photovoltaics.

China launches its first domestically-made aircraft carrier

China has launched its first aircraft carrier built entirely on its own, in a demonstration of the growing technical sophistication of its defense industries and determination to safeguard its maritime territorial claims and crucial trade routes.

AT&T sheds more lucrative wireless customers in 1Q

AT&T Inc. on Tuesday said it lost more of its most lucrative wireless customers during the first three months of the year as the country's biggest mobile carriers try to lure customers from each other with offers of unlimited data plans.

Internet firms winding up for a fight on 'net neutrality'

Internet companies are readying for a showdown with telecoms and a Republican-controlled government over a policy near and dear to their hearts: net neutrality.

Trump tweets don't help: 1st Twitter revenue drop since IPO

You'd think Twitter would be able to milk its status as President Donald Trump's megaphone. But the company still faces stagnant user growth, has never made a profit and even reported a quarterly revenue decline Wednesday, a first since going public.

Romania: hundreds of taxis, buses protest against Uber

Hundreds of taxi and bus drivers protested outside Romania's government offices on Wednesday to demand that Uber and other online ride service be outlawed.

Security firm: Cyberattacks against Saudi Arabia continue

Researchers at U.S. antivirus firm McAfee say the cyberattacks that have hit Saudi Arabia over the past few months are continuing, revealing new details about an unusually disruptive campaign.

UAE's first solar-powered gas station opens in Dubai

A government oil company in the United Arab Emirates says it has opened the country's first solar-powered gas station in Dubai.

World's first spherical drone display

NTT DOCOMO has developed a spherical drone display—an unmanned aerial vehicle that displays LED images on an omnidirectional spherical screen while in flight—which DOCOMO believes to be a world first.

Parental guidance relinquished to kids regarding digital media

Parents can toss out the owner's manual for that new smartphone or tablet—they can get all the digital assistance they need from their teens.

A new sensor increases smartwatch battery life five times

Nearly 80% of the battery power in smartwatches is used up by the heart-rate monitor. But a new generation of sensors developed by EPFL startup ActLight consumes five times less energy. They have been tested and calibrated, and are now ready to be mass-produced for use in new models.

Your headphones aren't spying on you, but your apps are

Lawyers in the U.S. are claiming that headphone and speaker company Bose, is secretly collecting information about what users listen to when they use its bluetooth wireless headphones.

Police around the world learn to fight global-scale cybercrime

From 2009 to 2016, a cybercrime network called Avalanche grew into one of the world's most sophisticated criminal syndicates. It resembled an international conglomerate, staffed by corporate executives, advertising salespeople and customer service representatives.

Twitter gets lift from uptick in user numbers

Twitter shares shot higher Wednesday after its quarterly update showed improving growth in user numbers, offsetting concerns over a decline in revenue and another net loss for the social network.

Artificial intelligence can accurately predict future heart disease and strokes, study finds

Computers that can teach themselves from routine clinical data are potentially better at predicting cardiovascular risk than current standard medical risk models, according to new research at the University of Nottingham.

The automation of art: A legal conundrum

In 1968, sociologist Jean Baudrillard wrote on automatism that "contained within it is the dream of a dominated world [...] that serves an inert and dreamy humanity."

Old car, new tricks: Adding safety tech to an older car

Old cars can learn new tricks.

Israel says it uncovered planned mass cyber attacks

Israeli authorities said on Wednesday that they had detected planned cyber attacks against 120 public and private targets in the Jewish state but did not specify the intended victims.

Virtual reality's cousin generating lots of buzz as Facebook, Apple, others focus on it

Last year, virtual reality generated lots of buzz. This year, the buzz is around a different kind of "reality" technology that could end up being more popular and useful.

For these startups, Silicon Valley's diversity problem brings big business

It's one of the tech industry's biggest embarrassments. But for a handful of startups, Silicon Valley's lack of diversity is also a money-making machine.

UK government complains after Twitter cuts data access

The British government has complained to Twitter over a block on access to data from the social network, which it was reportedly using to track potential terror attacks, officials said Wednesday.

FCC chief lays out attack on 'net neutrality' rules

Internet companies are readying for a showdown with a Republican-controlled government over a policy near and dear to their hearts: net neutrality.

Video captures bubble-blowing battery in action

With about three times the energy capacity by weight of today's lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries could one day enable electric cars to drive farther on a single charge.

Rideshare rivals Gett, Juno join forces

US-based ridesharing startups Gett and Juno announced Wednesday they were joining forces, helping them step up a challenge to larger rivals Uber and Lyft.

As Dubai focuses on future, cybersecurity a growing concern

A Dubai official says as the city races toward a future of self-driving cars and drones filling up its skies, cybersecurity is becoming a growing concern.

Backyard skinny-dippers lack effective laws to keep peeping drones at bay

Recent advances in technology mean we can no longer rely on fences or barriers around our homes to protect our privacy. This was certainly the case for Darwin resident Karli Hyatt, who on Tuesday explained to the ABC's Law Report how a drone invaded the security and privacy of her suburban backyard.

Small businesses can feel bigger effects from a PR disaster

Halfway through Valentine's Day, florist Ajay Kori realized he was in the midst of a disaster.

The man behind 2016's biggest US tech IPO shares how the deal went down

While most Silicon Valley tech startups were shying away from the public market last year and analysts were sounding alarm bells over the worrisome lack of IPOs, San Jose-based Nutanix was one of the few companies that took the plunge.

Comcast wants to switch out old boxes for new ones

Comcast wants your old cable box, demanding that you swap it out for a new one.

Informed Delivery service lets you peek at your mail before you get it

How would you like to know what's in your mailbox without looking?

Medicine & Health news

HIPPO's molecular balancing act helps nerves not short circuit

Scientists write in Nature Communications it may be possible to therapeutically fine tune a constantly shifting balance of molecular signals to ensure the body's peripheral nerves are properly insulated and functioning normally. In a study published April 26, they suggest this may be a way to treat neuropathies or prevent the development of peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

Link discovered between immune system, brain structure and memory

In two independent studies, scientists at the University of Basel have demonstrated that both the structure of the brain and several memory functions are linked to immune system genes. The scientific journals Nature Communications and Nature Human Behaviour have published the results of the research.

Study signals need to screen genes for stem cell transplants

Regenerative medicine using human pluripotent stem cells to grow transplantable tissue outside the body carries the promise to treat a range of intractable disorders, such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

Researchers uncover vital role for mitochondrial calcium exchange in heart function

Scientists have long thought that calcium transport into mitochondria - the powerhouses of cells - is a key signal linking cardiac workload, or how hard the heart pumps, with energy production. Studies at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) and elsewhere have shown the importance of this pathway during stress, but they have also questioned the dogma that mitochondrial calcium exchange is necessary for normal cardiac function. Now, in a major breakthrough, LKSOM researchers show that the exit of calcium from mitochondria serves a critical role in heart function and may represent a powerful therapeutic approach to limit heart disease.

Stanford scientists assemble working human forebrain circuits in a lab dish

Peering into laboratory glassware, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have watched stem-cell-derived nerve cells arising in a specific region of the human brain migrate into another brain region. This process recapitulates what's been believed to occur in a developing fetus, but has never previously been viewed in real time.

Fighting cancer with immunotherapy: Signaling molecule causes regression of blood vessels

Immunotherapy with T-cells offers great hope to people suffering from cancer. Some initial successes have already been made in treating blood cancer, but treating solid tumors remains a major challenge. The signaling molecule interferon gamma, which is produced by T-cells, plays a key role in the therapy. It cuts off the blood supply to tumors, as a new study in the journal Nature reveals.

Tracking unstable chromosomes helps predict lung cancer's return

Scientists have found that unstable chromosomes within lung tumours increases the risk of cancer returning after surgery, and have used this new knowledge to detect relapse long before standard testing. These are the first findings from the Cancer Research UK-funded TRACERx lung cancer study, published today (Wednesday) in the New England Journal of Medicine and Nature.

New publication highlights the anti-malarial efficacy of exciting new clinical candidate

A new paper published today in the prestigious journal Science Translational Medicine describes the discovery and biological profiling of an exciting new anti-malarial clinical drug candidate, MMV390048, effective against resistant strains of the malaria parasite, and across the entire parasite lifecycle, with the potential to cure and protect in a single dose. The research was conducted by the University of Cape Town (UCT)'s Drug Discovery and Development Centre, H3D, and Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV), in collaboration with a team of international researchers.

Could Parkinson's disease start in the gut?

Parkinson's disease may start in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve, according to a study published in the April 26, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The vagus nerve extends from the brainstem to the abdomen and controls unconscious body processes like heart rate and food digestion.

Transparent bones enable researchers to observe the stem cells inside

Ten years ago, the bones currently in your body did not actually exist. Like skin, bone is constantly renewing itself, shedding old tissue and growing it anew from stem cells in the bone marrow. Now, a new technique developed at Caltech can render intact bones transparent, allowing researchers to observe these stem cells within their environment. The method is a breakthrough for testing new drugs to combat diseases like osteoporosis.

Women with aortic aneurysms fare much worse than men, new study finds

The findings, published today in The Lancet, show women fare worse than men at every stage of treatment, leading to the study's authors to call for urgent improvement in how the condition is managed in women.

Risk of obesity influenced by changes in our genes

These changes, known as epigenetic modifications, control the activity of our genes without changing the actual DNA sequence. One of the main epigenetic modifications is DNA methylation, which plays a key role in embryonic development and the formation of different cell types, regulating when and where genes are switched on.

Link between alcohol consumption and cardiac arrhythmias

Researchers who studied beer drinkers at the Munich Octoberfest have found that the more alcohol consumed the higher was the likelihood of developing abnormal heart rhythms called cardiac arrhythmias.

Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to imbalanced microbiome

Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have discovered abnormal levels of specific gut bacteria related to chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis, or ME/CFS, in patients with and without concurrent irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS. Findings are published in the journal Microbiome.

Providers who prescribe PrEP don't see most patients increasing risky sexual behavior

A new study examining medical provider attitudes toward prescribing PrEP to prevent HIV found that those who already prescribe it do not see widespread increases in risky sexual behavior among their patients as a result. Also, providers do not consider such behavior change to be a reason to discontinue or limit PrEP.

New insights on triggering muscle formation

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified a previously unrecognized step in stem cell-mediated muscle regeneration. The study, published in Genes and Development, provides new insights on the molecular mechanisms that impair muscle stem cells (MuSCs) during the age-associated decline in muscle function that typically occurs in geriatric individuals. It also provides further insight into the connection between accelerated MuSC aging and muscular dystrophies.

Annual flu jab may pose greater risk for lung cancer patients under immunotherapy

Lung cancer patients treated with PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors may be at increased risk of adverse events after receiving the seasonal influenza vaccination, according to the first study measuring this effect.

Health care visionary from Liberia wins coveted TED prize

Raj Panjabi, who fled to the United States to escape civil war in his native Liberia, eventually returned to his shattered homeland to find rural communities desperate for adequate health care.

Anti-vaccine groups act as early warning sign against epidemics

For some people the issue of vaccination isn't about facts, it's a matter of faith, and this unshakable belief has become an opportunity for health workers to prepare for potential outbreaks.

Doctors turn scope on rare diseases

Lynn Whittaker stood in the hallway of her home looking at the framed photos on the wall. In one, her son, Andrew, is playing high school water polo. In another, he's holding a trombone.

Study finds major health benefits linked to indoor temperature variation

Exposure to environments outside a comfortable temperature could help tackle major metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, and should be reflected in modern building practices, finds a study published today.

Team identifies mechanism of dopaminergic neuronal death inhibition using stress hormone cortisol

DGIST's research team has found a candidate substance that can prevent and cure Parkinson's disease. By using this substance, the team also has identified the mechanism of dopaminergic neuronal death inhibition.

Click-on robotic prosthesis interfaces with nerves

Last Friday, the first patient in the Netherlands received his click-on robotic arm. By means of a new technique, this robotic arm is clicked directly onto the bone. A unique characteristic of this prosthesis is that it can be controlled by the patient's own thoughts. Worldwide, there are only a handful of patients with such a prosthesis.

With synthetic mucus, researchers take aim at antibiotic resistance

Researchers are pursuing an innovative and unexpected new avenue in the quest to fight antibiotic resistance: synthetic mucus. By studying and replicating mucus' natural ability to control pathogenic bacteria, the scientists hope to find new methods for combatting infections.

Couples counselling key to coping with severe premenstrual distress

A Western Sydney University study has found that couples counselling can be critical for women in the treatment of severe premenstrual symptoms (PMS).

Researchers reveal role of gene in IBD

Inside a healthy gut, bacteria and immune cells maintain a delicate balance. If that balance is disturbed, a condition called inflammatory bowel disease or IBD can result. Patients with IBD can experience diarrhea, abdominal pain, blood loss, fatigue, weight loss, and serious complications requiring surgery. To understand the underlying causes of IBD, a team of Yale researchers focused on understanding how genetic markers that have been linked to IBD contribute to the disease process.

A new ankle prosthetic allows amputees to pick up their foot and walk up slopes

The human ankle and foot have 26 bones, 33 joints, and 100 tendons, ligaments and muscles between them, making the lower leg one of the most complex parts of the body. Creating a prosthetic that mimics the behavior of so many moving parts is no easy feat, and designing a robotic system that does so is even more complicated. But a new prototype developed in the U.K. is paving the way for some 40 million amputees worldwide.

Can social networks help you get into shape?

Social networks are key tools in the daily lives of most Americans: We use Twitter to get breaking news, LinkedIn to search for jobs and Facebook to connect with friends. But what if social networks could help you be more physically fit?

Self-esteem among narcissists is 'puffed up, but shaky'

Like a grotesque mask reflected in a pool, narcissism has two faces, neither of them attractive. Narcissists have an inflated sense of self-worth, seeing themselves as superior beings who are entitled to special treatment.

Italian-style coffee reduces the risk of prostate cancer

Add another typical component of the Italian way of life to the long list of foods characterizing one of the most healthy populations in the world. This time it's coffee, prepared the Italian way. A research by the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention - I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, Italy, in collaboration with the Italian National Institute of Health and the I.R.C.C.S. Istituto Dermopatico dell'Immacolata of Rome, shows that three or more cups a day can lower prostate cancer risk. An antitumor action confirmed also by laboratory experiments.

Right-dose medication could save NHS millions and improve patient care, say experts

Twenty-one of the world's leading pharmacologists have urged drugs companies and governments to help change the way that medication is dosed by signing up to a 'roadmap for change'.

India gets its first free condom store

A global charity Wednesday launched a free condom store in India to try to reduce new cases of HIV/AIDS in a country with the world's third highest number.

Paradigm-changing clinical trial underway to better identify ureter during pelvic surgery

Women undergoing minimally invasive pelvic surgery are three to seven times more at risk of ureteral injury, the most common injury during this type of surgery. Warner K. Huh, M.D., director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Division of Gynecology Oncology, is conducting a new clinical trial for an infrared imaging agent used in hysterectomy patients to better identify the location of the ureter—the passage between kidney and bladder—during surgery.

New study shows youth violence on decline

Contrary to popular perception, a new study by Boston University professor Christopher Salas- Wright finds that youth violence is declining—and at noteworthy rates.

Obesity amplifies genetic risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

An international study based at UT Southwestern Medical Center revealed a striking genetic-environmental interaction: Obesity significantly amplifies the effects of three gene variants that increase risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by different metabolic pathways.

Clearing out old cells could extend joint health, stop osteoarthritis

In a preclinical study in mice and human cells, researchers report that selectively removing old or 'senescent' cells from joints could stop and even reverse the progression of osteoarthritis.

Do medical marijuana laws promote illicit cannabis use and disorder?

Illicit cannabis use and cannabis use disorders increased at a greater rate in states that passed medical marijuana laws than in other states, according to new research at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia University Medical Center. The findings will be published online in JAMA Psychiatry.

Scientists using high tech microscope find clues to an autoimmune disease

Using a unique microscope capable of illuminating living cell structures in great detail, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found clues into how a destructive autoimmune disease works, setting the stage for more discoveries in the future.

Early blood signatures of vaccine immunogenicity

Within seven days of vaccination, a blood test early after vaccination can predict whether vaccines based on living, modified viruses have had the desired effect. This is one of the results of a new study from a large European research collaboration on systems analysis of immune responses induced by a highly promising vaccine against Ebola in which the University of Gothenburg is participating. This result can inform and accelerate rational development of other new vaccines based on living viruses.

Newly prescribed sleeping pills increase risk of hip fracture

Older people newly prescribed sleeping pills like benzodiazepines and "Z-drugs' have over double the odds of a hip fracture in the first two weeks compared with non-users, according to a new study by researchers at Cardiff University and King's College London.

Dual coil defibrillators still more common than single coil models

The number of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) that use two coils to shock the heart has decreased in the last five years but are still more common than single coil models, according to a study published in JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology. There is emerging evidence that dual coil ICDs are not associated with lower mortality or lower rates of failed ICD shocks than single coil models in treating arrhythmias and are more difficult to extract.

Concise consent forms are effectively understood by clinical trial participants

Shortening consent documents makes no significant difference to how well potential research participants understand a clinical study, according to a study published April 26, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Christine Grady from the NIH Clinical Center, US, and colleagues.

Energy drinks linked to more heart, blood pressure changes than caffeinated drinks alone

Drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink resulted in more profound changes in the heart's electrical activity and blood pressure than drinking 32 ounces of a control drink with the same amount of caffeine - 320 milligrams (mg), according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Experts make the case for ending routine blood tests

The practice of ordering routine blood tests ("routine bloods") for patients attending hospital regardless of clinical need is wasteful and potentially damaging, argue experts in The BMJ this week.

Researchers explore personalized pharmacotherapy to treat panic attacks

Although drug therapy is the accepted first-line treatment for panic disorders (PDs), 17% to 64% of patients do not respond adequately and continue to exhibit one of the most common symptoms of PD, the panic attack (PA). In a comprehensive new analysis published in Personalized Medicine in Psychiatry, researchers carefully reviewed scientific data to establish whether a personalized treatment approach could help physicians prescribe the drug that will work most effectively for a specific patient.

New study deems dairy 'excellent' source of protein for children

Researchers at the University of Illinois are using pigs as a model to study the best way of evaluating protein quality in foods eaten by children, a method that was proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations in 2011.

Exercise guidelines: how much is enough?

(HealthDay)—When it comes to exercise, even a modest investment can pay off big time in terms of your health.

Model predicts which pediatric ER patients likely to be admitted

(HealthDay)—A new model can accurately predict pediatric patient hospitalization early in the emergency department encounter by using data commonly available in electronic medical records, according to a study published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

Breast cancer on the rise among Asian-Americans

When Margaret Abe-Koga was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, she was as surprised as anyone.

Study links cannabis use in adolescence to schizophrenia

Scientists believe that schizophrenia, a disorder caused by an imbalance in the brain's chemical reactions, is triggered by a genetic interaction with environmental factors. A new Tel Aviv University study published in Human Molecular Genetics now points to cannabis as a trigger for schizophrenia.

More women with atrial fibrillation die after ER discharge than men

(Edmonton, AB) Yet more evidence can be added to the growing literature that shows women with cardiovascular disease may receive different health care and experience worse outcomes than men.

Ingesting soy protein may ease severity of inflammatory bowel disease

A diet supplemented with soy protein may be an effective adjunct therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases, Penn State researchers reported after completing a study that included mice and cultured human colon cells.

Possible new tool for first responders: An ice bag to the face

A new study suggests a simple bag of ice water applied to the face could help maintain adequate blood pressure in people who have suffered significant blood loss. Blair Johnson, PhD, assistant professor at the University at Buffalo, will present his team's work at the American Physiological Society's annual meeting during the Experimental Biology 2017 meeting, to be held April 22-26 in Chicago.

Cancer risk rises after childhood organ transplant: study

(HealthDay)—Children given an organ transplant have a substantially higher risk of developing cancer—in some cases up to 200 times higher—than the general population, a new study finds.

Many patients with Alzheimer's disease discontinue AChEIs

(HealthDay)—Discontinuation of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) for treatment of Alzheimer's disease is common, with adverse effects and cost cited as major factors, according to a study published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Plasma uric acid lowering tied to drop in systolic BP in T1DM

(HealthDay)—Lowering of plasma uric acid (PUA) with febuxostat (FBX) is associated with a modest reduction in systolic blood pressure (BP) in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), according to a study published online April 13 in Diabetes.

Molecular autopsy IDs causes of sudden arrhythmic death

(HealthDay)—Molecular autopsy for electrical disorder and cardiomyopathy genes identifies a modest but realistic yield in sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS), according to a study published online April 24 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Checklist for family-centered rounds deemed beneficial

(HealthDay)—Implementation of a family-centered rounds (FCR) checklist and associated provider training is associated with an increase in the number of FCR elements performed, according to a study published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

Fatal case of suspected propofol-induced pancreatitis described

(HealthDay)—A fatal case of propofol-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis has been described in a case report published online April 10 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

Postbiotic could lower glucose, inflammation in obesity

(HealthDay)—The bacterial cell wall-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) postbiotic lowers adipose inflammation and reduces glucose intolerance in obese mice, according to an experimental study published online April 20 in Cell Metabolism.

Children with suspected child abuse present to hospital late

(HealthDay)—Children with suspected child abuse (SCA) present late to the hospital, and most arrive at hospitals that are not designated pediatric-capable major trauma centers, according to a study published online April 24 in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

Simple treatment for severe bleeding could save lives of mothers around the world

An inexpensive and widely available drug could save the lives of one in three mothers who would otherwise bleed to death after childbirth, according to a major study published in The Lancet. The global trial of 20,000 women found that death due to bleeding was reduced by 31% if the treatment was given within three hours.

Want to better comply with dietary guidelines, and save money? Cook dinner at home

The best culinary paths to better health are not always paved with cash, new research shows, and cooking at home can provide the best bang-for-the-buck nutritionally as well as financially.

Youth binge drinking, cardiovascular disease possibly linked

University of Illinois at Chicago researchers are conducting a study to determine whether binge drinking is related to cardiovascular disease in young adults who are not predisposed to the condition.

Readmission penalties don't correlate to heart attack outcomes

A program that penalizes hospitals for high early readmission rates of heart attack patients may be unfairly penalizing hospitals that serve a large proportion of African-Americans and those with more severe illness, a study by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers suggests.

Genomics research progresses from bench to bedside

The new Queensland Genomics Health Alliance hit a critical milestone today, with the first nine of its funded research projects revealed.

New tool uses genetic and clinical information to find the root cause of unexplained illnesses

An algorithm developed by Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) scientists has the potential to help patients with mysterious ailments find genetic causes for their undiagnosed diseases.

New method for early screening of colorectal cancer

A highly sensitive method that can detect even the earlier stages of colorectal cancer has been developed by researchers in Japan. Shimadzu Corporation, the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, and the National Cancer Center in Japan have collaborated to develop a new screening method that comprehensively analyzes the metabolites in our blood. The results of this research were published in the online edition of Oncotarget, a U.S. scientific publication, on February 4, 2017.

Impact of overtraining on the heart to be discussed at cardiovascular imaging meeting

The impact of overtraining on the heart is set to be discussed at Europe's leading cardiovascular magnetic resonance meeting, to be held 25 to 27 May in Prague, Czech Republic, at the Clarion Congress Hotel Prague (CCHP).

What can your doctor tell from your urine?

Doctors request a urine test to help diagnose and treat a range of conditions including kidney disorders, liver problems, diabetes and infections. Testing urine is also used to screen people for illicit drug use and to test if a woman is pregnant.

Pioneering research into benefit of computer games to treat Parkinson's Disease

North Wales neuroscientists are researching the potential benefits of brain stimulating computer games in the treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

First investigation of eye-tracking in electronic gaming machine play

New research, funded by GambleAware used eye-tracking to investigate how machine players pay attention to Electronic Gaming Machine (EGM) displays in local bookmaker offices.

Early results find horsemeat healthy for human consumption

The UPV/EHU's Consolidated Research Group Lactiker is conducting a study into the nutritional quality of horsemeat sold at large and small outlets in the autonomous communities (regions) in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Early results confirm that these products are a source of omega-3 fatty acids.

New test assesses sperm function

Two new publications in the journal Molecular Reproduction and Development validate the usefulness of a test that determines if sperm can capacitate, a process that allows them to fertilize an egg.

Creative animation empowers pregnant women to voice health concerns

A creative animation, developed as part of a collaboration between King's Improvement Science [KIS] and writer, artist, and facilitator Claire Collinson, is at the heart of a new campaign launched today by Tommy's charity, King's College London and the BabyCentre website to empower pregnant women to overcome fears about speaking to professionals about their health concerns.

GP job satisfaction falls while the challenges to the sector increase

A drop in job satisfaction among GP's, an increase in the number of women working in the role and significant funding reforms are transforming general medical practice in Australia, according to a major new study from the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne.

Autism Speaks issues special report

Autism Speaks today issued the first in a series of annual, in-depth reports on special topics in autism. Autism and Health: Advances in Understanding and Treating the Health Conditions that Frequently Accompany Autism gathers into one comprehensive report the most authoritative research and the latest guidelines on treatment and support of children and adults with autism spectrum disorder.

Team designs innovative 'Smart Scar-Care' pad to create a 'scar-less' world

An innovative "Smart Scar-Care" pad which serves the dual functions of reinforcing pressure and occlusion has been designed by The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) to treat hypertrophic scars from burns, surgeries and trauma. Compared with the traditional pressure pads and silicone gel sheets, "Smart Scar-Care" pad has the advantages of both.

p53 critical to recovering from acetaminophen overdose

Results from a new study show that after an acetaminophen overdose the p53 protein plays a key role in preventing the progression of liver damage and signaling the liver to repair itself. The findings could lead to new treatments for people who overdose on this popular pain reliever and fever reducer. Overdoses can lead to sudden liver failure and bring more than 50,000 people to emergency rooms in the U.S. every year.

New progress toward finding best cells for liver therapy

In a new study, researchers demonstrate successful transplantation of fetal rat liver cells to an injured adult rat liver. The work is an important step toward using transplanted cells to treat liver failure, which currently requires an organ transplant.

New studies refocus attention on the genotoxicity of AAV vectors in gene therapy

A growing number of preclinical studies in mice suggests that therapeutic gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) can cause insertional mutagenesis and increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the apparent safety of rAAV-mediated gene therapy in human clinical applications, the data emerging from some mouse studies emphasize the need to carefully reconsider the potential risk of genotoxicity, according to the authors of a provocative article published in Human Gene Therapy.

Nigeria meningitis deaths rise to 813

More than 800 people have died in a meningitis outbreak in Nigeria but the disease is now spreading more slowly, health minister Isaac Adewole said on Wednesday.

Hepatitis E outbreak kills 25 in Niger refugee camp

Bad water and hygiene have led to an epidemic of hepatitis E that has killed 25 people over several months in a refugee camp in Diffa, a region in southeast Niger, Medecins sans frontieres said Wednesday.

ER health promotion advocates help teens struggling with substance use get treatment

Health promotion advocates in the pediatric emergency room serve as a vital resource for young people experimenting with substances and linking them with necessary resources and treatment, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH).

Justices hear dispute over lower-cost biotech drugs sales

The Supreme Court on Wednesday considered a dispute between rival drug companies that could affect how quickly life-saving generic medicines are available to the public.

Researchers investigate technique to accelerate learning

Researchers at the Texas Biomedical Device Center (TxBDC) at The University of Texas at Dallas have been awarded a contract worth up to $5.8 million from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to investigate a novel approach to accelerate the learning of foreign languages.

Animal testing essential to medical progress but protocols could be improved: experts

The use of animals in biomedical research has long been the focus of campaigns by animal rights activists. Two leading scientists writing in the European Journal of Internal Medicine give their expert view of the importance of animal testing to medical progress and present ways it could be further improved to yield more useful clinical results.

Biology news

Wind, rain play key role in breeding patterns of migratory tree swallows

Wind and precipitation play a crucial role in advancing or delaying the breeding cycles of North American tree swallows, according to the results of a new University of Colorado Boulder-led study.

Baby whales 'whisper' to mothers to avoid predators: study

Newborn humpback whales and their mothers whisper to each other to escape potential predators, scientists reported Wednesday, revealing the existence of a previously unknown survival technique.

Common pesticide damages honey bee's ability to fly

Biologists at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time that a widely used pesticide can significantly impair the ability of otherwise healthy honey bees to fly, raising concerns about how pesticides affect their capacity to pollinate and the long-term effects on the health of honey bee colonies.

Study settles debate over origins of ants and bees

Ants and bees – which by all appearances seem so different – are creepy-crawly cousins, according to new research published in a recent issue of Current Biology.

New Zealand fish and chips hold human DNA clues

Before you pop that piece of battered fish in your mouth, be aware it might just hold the key to understanding the origins of a form of DNA memory critical to human development.

New genes are more likely than expected to emerge full-fledged from a genome's non-coding regions

New genes are more likely to appear on the stage of evolution in full-fledged form rather than gradually take shape through successive stages of "proto genes" that become more and more refined over generations. This is the surprising upshot from research led by Benjamin Wilson and Joanna Masel at the University of Arizona, published as an Advance Online Publication by the scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution on April 24.

Study identifies optimum human hand-throwing techniques

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Harvard and Yale Universities has conducted a study of optimal human throwing techniques and found which work best under which conditions. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Madhusudhan Venkadesan and Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan describe how they combined physics with observed results to learn which techniques work best in which situations.

Discovering a new mechanism of epigenetic inheritance

Giacomo Cavalli's team at the Institute of Human Genetics (University of Montpellier / CNRS), in collaboration with the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), has demonstrated the existence of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance (TEI) among Drosophila fruit flies. By temporarily modifying the function of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins—which play an essential role in development—the researchers obtained fruit fly lines having the same DNA sequence but different eye colors. An example of epigenetic inheritance, this color diversity reflects varying degrees of heritable, but reversible, gene repression by PcG proteins. It is observed in both transgenic and wild-type lines and can be modified by environmental conditions such as ambient temperature. The scientists' work is published in Nature Genetics.

'First arrival' hypothesis in Darwin's finches gets some caveats

Being first in a new ecosystem provides major advantages for pioneering species, but the benefits may depend on just how competitive later-arriving species are. That is among the conclusions in a new study testing the importance of "first arrival" in controlling adaptive radiation of species, a hypothesis famously proposed for "Darwin's Finches," birds from the Galapagos Islands that were first brought to scientific attention by Darwin.

Barley genome sequenced

Looking for a better beer or single malt Scotch whiskey? A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside may have you covered. They are among a group of 77 scientists worldwide who have sequenced the complete genome of barley, a key ingredient in beer and single malt Scotch. The research, 10 years in the making, was just published in the journal Nature.

Researchers identify genes that help trout find their way home

In the spring when water temperatures start to rise, rainbow trout that have spent several years at sea traveling hundreds of miles from home manage, without maps or GPS, to find their way back to the rivers and streams where they were born for spawning.

Seabird parents compensate for struggling partners

For species where both parents work together to raise their offspring, cooperation is key—it's as true for birds as it is for us! A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows how pairs of Common Murres update each other on their condition so that when one partner needs a break, the other can pick up the slack.

China's rare milu deer return in victory for conservation

The newborn fawn walks unsteadily among the trees that were once part of the Chinese emperor's hunting grounds, where more than a century before its forebears died out in their native China.

No, epigenetics and environmental responsiveness don't undermine Darwinian evolution

The remarkable adaptability of octopus with new evidence showing they can alter the information copied from their DNA is an example of epigenetics: modification of gene expression by factors "above" the DNA.

The impact of a guide dog extends far beyond its guiding responsibilities

Preliminary findings from world-first research reveal the impact of a guide dog extends far beyond its ability to guide its handler.

Drones that detect early plant disease could save crops

Researchers are developing drones that could detect plant disease before any visible signs show, allowing farmers to stop infections in their tracks.

Researcher studies the feeding habits of stomatopod crustaceans

Biology Letters talks to Maya deVries, author of a recently published article that describes the feeding habits of stomatopod crustaceans with two kinds of highly specialized feeding appendages; those with elongated spear-like appendages (spearers) or hammer-like appendages (smashers).

Pac-Man meets biotechnology

Scientists in the U.S have a designed a computer game that could help with biomedical research.

Larger schooling fish found to have stronger attraction forces

In schooling fish, collective movement emerges as a result of multiple social interactions between individuals. In a new study led by researchers at Uppsala University, larger individuals have been found to display stronger attraction forces to one another than smaller individuals. Short range repulsion forces, on the other hand, are the same regardless of fish size.

Urbanisation costs 5 billion years of evolutionary history

All over the globe, the urbanisation of landscapes is increasing. 60% of the land surface which is expected to be urban by 2030 is currently not built on at all. How this will impact on biological diversity will only be apparent in retrospect. However, for most cities there have been systematic surveys of biological diversity, although only since the second half of the 20th century. Researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) have now revealed, on the basis of historical data, how plant diversity in the region of Halle an der Saale has changed in over 300 years of urbanisation, and have also made predictions about the future.

Digital life project uses 3-D to document endangered frogs

The Digital Life team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by evolutionary biologist Duncan Irschick today unveiled an online set of 15 three-dimensional (3D) models of live frogs, including several endangered species, to promote conservation, education and science by showcasing their extraordinary beauty and vulnerability to ecological threats.

Limited gene flow between two Bengal tiger populations in the western Himalayan foothills

The flow of genes between Bengal tigers in two reserves of the Terai Arc Landscape in western Himalayan foothills is too low, according to a study published April 26, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Surendra Prakash Goyal from Wildlife Institute of India, India, and colleagues.

Wasps and wine: Paper wasps contribute to sour rot disease, a scourge of wine industry

Come harvest season, wine makers have grown accustomed to looking for the telltale signs of a common but devastating threat: black mold and spores combined with a distinct acidic smell. These symptoms are associated with grape sour rot disease, an incurable condition involving the decomposition of damaged berries that ultimately degrades wine quality, resulting in millions of dollars in losses annually.

Sri Lanka overturns ban on adopting elephants

Sri Lanka said Wednesday it would allow rich individuals and temples to adopt baby elephants, overturning a ban put in place to protect the animals.

Conservation endocrinology sheds light on a changing world

As species rapidly adapt to altered landscapes and a warming climate, scientists and stakeholders need new techniques to monitor ecological responses and plan future conservation efforts. Writing in BioScience, Stephen McCormick of the US Geological Survey and Michael Romero of Tufts University describe the emerging field of conservation endocrinology and its growing role in addressing the effects of environmental change. The authors argue that, bolstered by the development of new field-sampling techniques, researchers working in this area are poised to make substantial contributions to the wider field of conservation biology.

Can aromatherapy calm competition horses?

Although studies suggest that inhaling certain scents may reduce stress in humans, aromatherapy is relatively unexplored in veterinary medicine. But new research presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017 in Chicago raises the question of whether aromatherapy may be beneficial to horses as well.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you no longer want to receive this email use the link below to unsubscribe.
https://sciencex.com/profile/nwletter/
You are subscribed as jmabs1@gmail.com

1 comment:

chalse williams said...

Hello I’m here to giving a testimony on how Dr. NATA the great Herbalist cured my HIV disease with herbal medicine, though I went through different website I saw different testimonies about different herbalists, I was like: “Many people have the HIV cure why are people still suffering from it?” I though of it, then I contact Dr. NATA via email, I didn’t believe him that much, I just wanted to give him a try, he replied my mail and ask for some Information about me, then I sent them to him, he prepared the herbal medicine and sent it to me via UPS courier service, they told me that it will take 3-4 days before I we get the parcel, 3 days later I received the package and I started taking the medicine as prescribed by him, after 7 days of taking the medicine I went for check-up, I was tested HIV NEGATIVE... I’M GOING TO ASSIST ANYBODY THAT CONTACT HIM FOR HELP, IF YOU ARE SERIOUS YOU WILL BE CURED!!! contact him via: drnataherbalcure412@gmail.com or whatsapp +2348118186684