Wednesday, October 1, 2014

[NASA HQ News] NASA Awards Enterprise-Wide Procurement Contracts

 
October 1, 2014
NASA Awards Enterprise-Wide Procurement Contracts

NASA has awarded 56 contracts under the Solutions for Enterprise-Wide Procurement (SEWP) V. Twenty-three contracts were awarded in the Computer Based Systems, Group A, and 33 contracts were awarded in the Networking/Security/Video and Conference Tools, Group D.

All the awards are for firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contracts.

The minimum amount of supplies or services that may be ordered is $25.00 with a maximum of $20 billion per contract.

Each contract will have an effective ordering period of 10 years, consisting of a five-year base period from Nov. 1 to Oct. 31, 2019, and one five-year option to extend the period of performance through Oct. 31, 2024.

The principal purpose of the SEWP V contracts is to provide state-of-the-art information technology and computer technologies, high-end scientific and engineering processing capabilities, network equipment and peripherals. These Government-Wide Acquisition Contracts are available for ordering by all NASA centers, all federal agencies and their contractors. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland procures and manages the SEWP V effort.

The list of the awardees and more information about the SEWP V program are available at:

https://www.sewp.nasa.gov/sewpv/

For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

-end-

Sonja Alexander
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1761
sonja.r.alexander@nasa.gov

Cynthia M. O'Carroll
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
410-507-0958
cynthia.m.ocarroll@nasa.gov


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[NASA HQ News] NASA Invites Public to Participate in #SkyScience for Earth Science Week

 
October 1, 2014
NASA Invites Public to Participate in #SkyScience for Earth Science Week

 NASA Invites Public to Participate in #SkyScience 

NASA is inviting people around the globe to step outside during Earth Science Week, Oct. 12-18, observe the sky and share their observations as citizen scientists.

NASA's #SkyScience activity is part of an annual educational event organized by the American Geosciences Institute to encourage the public to engage in Earth sciences. Citizen scientists can participate in this global Earth science data collection event by observing, photographing and reporting on clouds over their location as a NASA satellite passes over. Reports and photos will be compared to data collected by NASA Earth-observing instruments as a way to assess the satellite measurements.

Using the hashtag #SkyScience, participants are encouraged to post their cloud and sky photos and observation experiences to Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Google+ and Flickr. Throughout the week, NASA will share some of the most interesting photos on the agency's social media accounts.

In addition to #SkyScience, NASA has been engaging students in cloud observation for years through the agency's Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) Project.

"#SkyScience is another opportunity to get lots of reports in a short period of time and enable additional statistical analysis," said S'COOL project lead Lin Chambers of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

To learn how to get involved in the #SkyScience activity, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/skysci

For information about NASA's Earth science activities in 2014, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow

-end-

Steve Cole
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0918
stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov

Mike Finneran
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.
757-864-6110
michael.p.finneran@nasa.gov


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EMBO reports Table of Contents for October 2014; Vol. 15, No. 10

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Table of Contents

Editorial
Science & Society
Reviews
Scientific Reports
Corrigendum
COVER

Volume 15, Number 10



Editorial
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I have a dream…. that one day top‐quality science will be practised all over the world.
Howy Jacobs
Published online 01.10.2014

Science & Society
Thumb
Are we alone in the universe? For the first time in its history, humankind has the tools to look for potentially habitable planets and discern whether they too have evolved life.
Margaret C Turnbull
Published online 17.09.2014

Thumb
The imbalance between the growing number of PhD graduates and the stagnating number of research positions damages science and scientists alike. With the world facing serious challenges in climate and health, governments need to redress the balance to create a solid research base.
Kevin Titeca, Liesbeth Aerts, Michiel Krols, Lana Vandersarren, Özden Akay, Şule Yılmaz, Nevena Hristozova, and Michal Janiak
Published online 12.09.2014

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Speaking two languages has a positive effect on cognition and might even delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. Researchers are just beginning to unravel the neurological underpinnings of this bilingual advantage.
Katrin Weigmann
Published online 09.09.2014

Thumb
Genomics is unraveling the migratory history of modern humans. Knowledge about how they adapted to new environments and pathogens has implications for human health today and may also help to counter the toxic notion of “races”.
Philip Hunter
Published online 12.09.2014

Reviews
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People think to be in control of their decisions. Recent research identifying molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie decision‐making behaviour in model organisms suggests that it goes beyond the control of reason.
Nilay Yapici, Manuel Zimmer, and Ana I Domingos
Published online 19.09.2014

Thumb
Cholesterol is well known to be essential for normal brain and neuron function. This review discusses how defects in cholesterol metabolism might contribute to neurological syndromes, either as a cause or a consequence of these serious illnesses.
Mauricio G Martín, Frank Pfrieger, and Carlos G Dotti
Published online 15.09.2014

Scientific Reports
Thumb
This study shows that Atg5 promotes astrocyte differentiation during embryonic brain development through autophagic degradation of SOCS2 and activation of the JAK2‐STAT3 pathway.
Shukun Wang, Baoguo Li, Huimin Qiao, Xiaohui Lv, Qingli Liang, Zixiao Shi, Wenlong Xia, Fen Ji, and Jianwei Jiao
Published online 15.09.2014

Thumb
This study shows that both p53 and p21WAF1 bind to Slug and cooperate to promote the Mdm2‐dependent degradation of Slug, thus suppressing cell invasion.
Jongdoo Kim, Seunghee Bae, Sungkwan An, Jong Kuk Park, Eun Mi Kim, Sang‐Gu Hwang, Wun‐Jae Kim, and Hong‐Duck Um
Published online 20.08.2014

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This study provides guidelines and protocols for the accurate quantification of the specific contribution of UCP1 to thermogenesis in brown and brite/beige adipocytes.
Yongguo Li, Tobias Fromme, Sabine Schweizer, Theresa Schöttl, and Martin Klingenspor
Published online 18.08.2014

Thumb
Variously tethered ubiquitins, expressed as linear histone‐ubiquitin fusions, can substitute for native H2BK123ub in the crosstalk to H3 methylation and in the DNA damage response. This reveals a remarkable plasticity in H2Bub signaling in vivo.
Hanneke Vlaming, Tibor van Welsem, Erik L de Graaf, David Ontoso, AF Maarten Altelaar, Pedro A San‐Segundo, Albert JR Heck, and Fred van Leeuwen
Published online 20.08.2014

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The crystal structure of PI4K IIα reveals its membrane binding mode and highlights a membrane‐oriented hydrophobic pocket as a potential allosteric regulatory site.
Adriana Baumlova, Dominika Chalupska, Bartosz Róźycki, Marko Jovic, Eva Wisniewski, Martin Klima, Anna Dubankova, Daniel P Kloer, Radim Nencka, Tamas Balla, and Evzen Boura
Published online 28.08.2014

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This study shows that the Tel1ATM checkpoint kinase is required in S phase for the early firing of origins of DNA replication located near short telomeres. The data indicate that Tel1ATM controls the timing of telomerase recruitment to short telomeres.
Carol Cooley, Anoushka Davé, Mansi Garg, and Alessandro Bianchi
Published online 13.08.2014 Open Access

Corrigendum

 
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The EMBO Journal Table of Contents for 1 October 2014; Vol. 33, No. 19

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Table of Contents

Have you seen?
Review
Articles
COVER

Volume 33, Number 19



Have you seen?
Thumb
A new study reports genome‐wide occupancy maps of H3K27me3 during pancreatic progenitor differentiation. The functional perturbation of Ezh2 increases endocrine progenitor fate and could thus inform therapeutically relevant differentiation protocols.
Holger A Russ and Matthias Hebrok
Published online 25.08.2014

Thumb
Andree and colleagues report that an intracellular bacterial pathogen exploits apoptotic machinery to suppress host immune signaling, yet avoids cell death.
Denise N Bronner and Mary XD O'Riordan
Published online 01.09.2014

Thumb
Dictyostelium inositol lipids have unique glycerol backbones, indicating that different lipid tails have evolved to serve specific functions.
Gerald R V Hammond and Tamas Balla
Published online 01.09.2014

Review
Thumb
Damaged mitochondria are eliminated via mitophagy to prevent cell death. To preserve mitochondria, oxidized proteins can be shuttled away in mitochondrial derived vesicles that also provide a general trafficking route from mitochondria to other organelles.
Ayumu Sugiura, Gian‐Luca McLelland, Edward A Fon, and Heidi M McBride
Published online 08.08.2014

Articles
Thumb
The in vivo analysis of Ezh2‐dependent H3K27me3‐dynamics during pancreatic endocrine specification could instruct optimized ES cell differentiation for future therapeutic application.
Cheng‐Ran Xu, Lin‐Chen Li, Greg Donahue, Lei Ying, Yu‐Wei Zhang, Paul Gadue, and Kenneth S Zaret
Published online 08.08.2014

Thumb
Invasive Shigella bacteria co‐opt the mitochondrial XIAP antagonist SMAC in ways that selectively decrease antibacterial inflammatory responses without triggering host cell apoptosis.
Maria Andree, Jens M Seeger, Stephan Schüll, Oliver Coutelle, Diana Wagner‐Stippich, Katja Wiegmann, Claudia M Wunderlich, Kerstin Brinkmann, Pia Broxtermann, Axel Witt, Melanie Fritsch, Paola Martinelli, Harald Bielig, Tobias Lamkemeyer, Elena I Rugarli, Thomas Kaufmann, Anja Sterner‐Kock, F Thomas Wunderlich, Andreas Villunger, L Miguel Martins, Martin Krönke, Thomas A Kufer, Olaf Utermöhlen, and Hamid Kashkar
Published online 23.07.2014

Thumb
A new mass spectrometry technique reveals that inositol phospholipids in Dictyostelium are based on a novel backbone. These plasmanyl inositides are functionally identical to the canonical diacyl glycerol configurations found in mammalian cells.
Jonathan Clark, Robert R Kay, Anna Kielkowska, Izabella Niewczas, Louise Fets, David Oxley, Len R Stephens, and Phillip T Hawkins
Published online 01.09.2014

Thumb
Post‐transcriptional gene expression control by NANOS is up‐regulated and functionally important in pRb‐deficient cells. Interplay of transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation explains how cells with mutations in the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor can contribute relatively normally to tissues in mice and flies.
Wayne O Miles, Michael Korenjak, Lyra M Griffiths, Michael A Dyer, Paolo Provero, and Nicholas J Dyson
Published online 06.08.2014

Thumb
Maternal expression of the imprinted miRNA cluster miR‐379/miR‐410 is central for metabolic adaptation in new‐born mice, uncovering a physiological role for these miRNAs in regulating neonatal hepatic gene expression.
Stéphane Labialle, Virginie Marty, Marie‐Line Bortolin‐Cavaillé, Magali Hoareau‐Osman, Jean‐Philippe Pradère, Philippe Valet, Pascal GP Martin, and Jérôme Cavaillé
Published online 14.08.2014

Thumb
The neuronal activity regulated miR‐134/Pum2/Plk2 pathway mediates synaptic depression in primary hippocampal neurons by inhibiting the AMPA‐type glutamate receptor GluA2.
Roberto Fiore, Marek Rajman, Chrysovalandis Schwale, Silvia Bicker, Anna Antoniou, Claus Bruehl, Andreas Draguhn, and Gerhard Schratt
Published online 05.08.2014

Thumb
This study reports first evidence for tubulin glycylation to affect the establishment and maintenance of primary cilia. Functional abrogation of tubulin glycine ligases impacts cell proliferation and tumor onset.
Cecilia Rocha, Laura Papon, Wulfran Cacheux, Patricia Marques Sousa, Valeria Lascano, Olivia Tort, Tiziana Giordano, Sophie Vacher, Benedicte Lemmers, Pascale Mariani, Didier Meseure, Jan Paul Medema, Ivan Bièche, Michael Hahne, and Carsten Janke
Published online 01.09.2014

Thumb
The fungal transcription factor HapX is involved in adaptation to both iron starvation and excess. HapX and the CCAAT‐binding complex cooperatively bind to the promoter of the vacuolar iron transporter gene and regulate its expression to control vacuolar iron storage.
Fabio Gsaller, Peter Hortschansky, Sarah R Beattie, Veronika Klammer, Katja Tuppatsch, Beatrix E Lechner, Nicole Rietzschel, Ernst R Werner, Aaron A Vogan, Dawoon Chung, Ulrich Mühlenhoff, Masashi Kato, Robert A Cramer, Axel A Brakhage, and Hubertus Haas
Published online 04.08.2014 Open Access

 
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Nature contents: 02 October 2014

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  Volume 514 Number 7520   
 

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The science that matters. Every week.

 
     
 
 
 
Quickly Identify Disease-Causing Variants.
HGMD® Professional is the most widely used reference on inherited disease mutations. Quickly access detailed reports without time consuming literature searches and verify whether an observed mutation is novel or has been previously described. Doing high-throughput mapping for NGS variant analysis? Learn to prioritize mutations using BIOBASE's companion tool - Genome Trax™. Try it now!
 
 
 

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 News & Comment    Biological Sciences    Health Sciences
 
 Physical Sciences    Earth & Environmental Sciences    Careers & Jobs
 
 
 

This week's highlights

 
 

Biological Sciences

More Biological sciences
 
Reversion of advanced Ebola virus disease in nonhuman primates with ZMapp
 

This study shows that ZMapp, the optimized cocktail of three monoclonal antibodies that has been pressed into clinical use in response to the current Ebola virus disease epidemic, was able to rescue all of 18 Rhesus macaques when treatment was initiated up to five days post-infection. All three controls had died by day eight.

 
 
 

Physical Sciences

More Physical sciences
 
Structure and evolution of the lunar Procellarum region as revealed by GRAIL gravity data
 

Clues about the origin of the Moon's Procellarum – a large region previously interpreted to be an ancient impact basin – are provided in an analysis of data from NASA's GRAIL mission. Analysis of gravity anomalies suggests that surface features, previously interpreted as remnants of an impact basin rim, are instead the remains of the magma plumbing system for much of the volcanism in this region. The pattern of structures is strikingly similar to the structures seen on Saturn’s moon Enceladus, which may have experienced a similar geodynamic history.

 
 
 

Earth & Environmental Sciences

More Earth & Environmental sciences
 
Prevalence of viscoelastic relaxation after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake
 

This paper presents revised estimates of the afterslip following the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. Based on seafloor GPS observations made immediately after the earthquake, Tianhaozhe Sun et al. obtain clear evidence for the dominant role of viscoelastic relaxation in short-term postseismic deformation, rather than elastic afterslip on the fault as is commonly assumed. They conclude that models which erroneously assume an elastic Earth substantially overestimate afterslip downdip of the rupture zone, and underestimate afterslip updip.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Podcast & Video

 
 

In this week's podcast: the bugs that call our skin their home, excessive water use in Asia, and what's made crazy shapes on the surface of the Moon?

 
 
 
 
News & Comment Read daily news coverage top
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

THIS WEEK

 
 
 
 
 

Editorials

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Retraction challenges ▶

 
 

Cleaning up the literature can be difficult.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Warming up ▶

 
 

Prospects for international agreement on combating climate change look brighter.

 
 
 
 
 
 

BRAIN gain ▶

 
 

A mixture of focus and innovation is the way forward for big neuroscience.

 
 
 
 
 
 

World View

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Water politics must adapt to a warming world ▶

 
 

As rainfall patterns shift, technological and legislative changes are needed to address water shortages, says Moshe Alamaro.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Seven Days

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Seven days: 26 September–2 October ▶

 
 

The week in science: Japanese volcano erupts, India's Mars mission enters orbit, and Obama orders massive expansion of marine reserve.

 
 
 
 
 
 

NEWS IN FOCUS

 
 
 
 
 

Fast genetic sequencing saves newborn lives ▶

 
 

Infants with mysterious conditions stand to benefit — but technique raises ethical questions.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Biopiracy ban stirs red-tape fears ▶

 
 

Critics worry Nagoya Protocol will hamper disease monitoring.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Ebola outbreak shuts down malaria-control efforts ▶

 
 

Public-health experts fear that one epidemic may fuel another in West Africa.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Tibetan plateau gets wired up for monsoon prediction ▶

 
 

Largest and highest plateau in the world has outsized impact on climate.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Forensic chemistry could stop African plant thieves ▶

 
 

Isotope analysis could help in the rush to save South Africa's cycads from extinction.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Astronomy data bounty spurs debate over access ▶

 
 

Small institutions fear exclusion from Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's benefits.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Features

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Astronomy: To catch a cosmic ray ▶

 
 

The Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina has spent almost ten years looking for the source of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays — but to no avail. Now the observatory faces an uncertain future.

 
 
 
 
 
 

The first South Americans: Extreme living ▶

 
 

After humans arrived in South America, they quickly spread into some of its most remote corners.

 
 
 
 
 
 

COMMENT

 
 
 
 
 

Resources: Curb vast water use in central Asia ▶

 
 

Irrigation-intensive industries in former Soviet republics have sucked water bodies dry. Olli Varis calls for economic reform to ease environmental and social tensions.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Climate policy: Ditch the 2 °C warming goal ▶

 
 

Average global temperature is not a good indicator of planetary health. Track a range of vital signs instead, urge David G. Victor and Charles F. Kennel.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Books and Arts

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Computing history: Geeks, Inc. ▶

 
 

Jennifer Light enjoys a chronicle of the collaborations that conjured the digital realm.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Books in brief ▶

 
 

Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Genetics: The neighbourly nature of evolution ▶

 
 

Mark Pagel relishes an analysis of how natural selection riffles through life's immense genetic library.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Correspondence

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Scientific misconduct: Research integrity guidelines in Japan Masanori Wada | Preventative care: Lung-cancer screens now worth the cost Laurie Fenton-Ambrose, Ella A. Kazerooni | Society: Protect privacy of mobile data Caroline O. Buckee | Environment: Invest in renewable energy in Tibet Gang Liu, Mario Lucas | Psychosocial models: Focus on positive features of ageing Theodore D. Cosco, Carol Brayne, Blossom C. M. Stephan

 
 
 
 
 
 

Correction

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Correction ▶

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Biological Sciences top
 
 
 
 
 
 

RESEARCH

 
 
 
 
 

Latest Online

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Evolutionary biology: Survival of the fittest group ▶

 
 

Timothy Linksvayer

 
 
 
 
 
 

Immunology: Starve a fever, feed the microbiota ▶

 
 

Seth Rakoff-Nahoum, Laurie E. Comstock

 
 
 
 
 
 

Genomics: Of monarchs and migration ▶

 
 

Richard H. Ffrench-Constant

 
 
 
 
 
 

Lung disease: Treatment by cell transplant ▶

 
 

Mary Jane Thomassen, Mani S. Kavuru

 
 
 
 
 
 

Animal behaviour: Incipient tradition in wild chimpanzees ▶

 
 

Andrew Whiten

 
 
 
 
 
 

Pulmonary macrophage transplantation therapy ▶

 
 

Takuji Suzuki, Paritha Arumugam, Takuro Sakagami et al.

 
 

This study reports the correction of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) in Csf2rb–/– mice by a single transfer of either wild-type or gene-corrected macrophages directly to the lungs — the transplanted macrophages persisted for at least 1 year; this transplantation strategy obviated the need for myeloablation and immunosuppression and should be a feasible therapy for humans with hereditary PAP.

 
 
 
 
 
 

The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning colouration ▶

 
 

Shuai Zhan, Wei Zhang, Kristjan Niitepõld et al.

 
 

The monarch butterfly, well known for its spectacular annual migration across North America, is shown by genome sequencing of monarchs from around the world to have been ancestrally migratory and to have dispersed out of North America to occupy its current broad distribution; the authors also discovered signatures of selection associated with migration within loci implicated in flight muscle function, leading to greater flight efficiency.

 
 
 
 
 
 

An evolutionary arms race between KRAB zinc-finger genes ZNF91/93 and SVA/L1 retrotransposons ▶

 
 

Frank M. J. Jacobs, David Greenberg, Ngan Nguyen et al.

 
 

The authors show that two primate-specific genes encoding KRAB domain containing zinc finger proteins, ZNF91 and ZNF93, have evolved during the last 25 million years to repress retrotransposon families that emerged during this time period; according to the new data KZNF gene expansion limits the activity of newly emerged retrotransposons, which subsequently mutate to evade repression.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Loss of signalling via Gα13 in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma ▶

 
 

Jagan R. Muppidi, Roland Schmitz, Jesse A. Green et al.

 
 

Inactivation of the S1PR2–Gα13–ARHGEF1 signalling pathway in mice allows Akt activation and promotes dissemination of germinal centre B cells, consistent with a role of function-disrupting mutations in the systemic dissemination of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Programmable RNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9 ▶

 
 

Mitchell R. O’Connell, Benjamin L. Oakes, Samuel H. Sternberg et al.

 
 

In the presence of a short DNA oligonucleotide containing a protospacer adjacent motif, a guide-RNA-programmed Cas9 is able to specifically bind and/or cleave single-stranded RNA—this system can be used to isolate specific endogenous RNA transcripts from a cell lysate without any tag or modification.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Dietary modulation of the microbiome affects autoinflammatory disease ▶

 
 

John R. Lukens, Prajwal Gurung, Peter Vogel et al.

 
 

Pstpip2-mutant mice fed a high-fat diet are protected against inflammatory bone disease and bone erosion; this protection is associated with reductions in intestinal Prevotella levels and pro-IL-1β expression, and is dependent on the deletion of both caspases 1 and 8.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Site-specific group selection drives locally adapted group compositions ▶

 
 

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Charles J. Goodnight

 
 

Here, colonies of social spiders are used to investigate the evolution of a group-level trait, the ratio of individuals with the ‘docile’ versus ‘aggressive’ phenotype in a colony; experimental colonies were generated with varying ratios and established in the wild, revealing group-level selection.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Mitochondrial UPR-regulated innate immunity provides resistance to pathogen infection ▶

 
 

Mark W. Pellegrino, Amrita M. Nargund, Natalia V. Kirienko et al.

 
 

A link between an intracellular stress response, bacterial infection and triggering of the innate immune response is shown in Caenorhabditis elegans; exposure to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused activation of the transcription factor ATFS-1 and innate immunity that is regulated by the mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Rapid fucosylation of intestinal epithelium sustains host–commensal symbiosis in sickness ▶

 
 

Joseph M. Pickard, Corinne F. Maurice, Melissa A. Kinnebrew et al.

 
 

Systemic exposure to Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands during sickness is shown to induce fucosylation of the small intestine in mice; some of the fucose is shed into the intestinal lumen, where it provides nourishment for the microbiota.

 
 
 
 
 
 

The complete structure of the large subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome ▶

 
 

Basil J. Greber, Daniel Boehringer, Marc Leibundgut et al.

 
 

The structure of the 39S large mitoribosome subunit is solved by cryo-electron microscopy at an impressive 3.4 Å resolution, revealing the location of 50 ribosomal proteins, the peptidyl transferase centre, the tRNAs within this active site, and the nascent peptide chain within the exit tunnel.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Articles and Letters

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Reversion of advanced Ebola virus disease in nonhuman primates with ZMapp ▶

 
 

Xiangguo Qiu, Gary Wong, Jonathan Audet et al.

 
 

A new treatment, containing an optimized cocktail of three monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus, provided full protection and disease reversal in rhesus monkeys when given under conditions in which controls succumbed by day 8; this new therapy may be a good candidate for treating Ebola virus infection in human patients.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Molecular basis of adaptation to high soil boron in wheat landraces and elite cultivars ▶

 
 

Margaret Pallotta, Thorsten Schnurbusch, Julie Hayes et al.

 
 

Adaptation of wheat to environments where growth is limited by boron toxicity has resulted from multiple genomic changes and selection for functionally diverse alleles.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity ▶

 
 

Andriy Marusyk, Doris P. Tabassum, Philipp M. Altrock et al.

 
 

To investigate the role of sub-clonal tumour heterogeneity in cancer progression, a mouse xenograft model was used which revealed that tumour growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation by a non-cell-autonomous mechanism, although this minor subpopulation can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Biogeography and individuality shape function in the human skin metagenome ▶

 
 

Julia Oh, Allyson L. Byrd, Clay Deming et al.

 
 

Previous work has shown that human skin is home to a rich and varied microbiota; here a metagenomic approach for samples from physiologically diverse body sites illuminates that the skin microbiota, including bacterial, fungal and viral members, is shaped by the local biogeography and yet marked by strong individuality.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche ▶

 
 

John R. B. Perry, Felix Day, Cathy E. Elks et al.

 
 

Here 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche, a marker of puberty timing in females, are identified; these loci show enrichment for genes involved in nuclear hormone receptor function, body mass index, and rare disorders of puberty, and for genes located in imprinted regions, with parent-of-origin specific effects at several loci.

 
 
 
 
 
 

The neurotrophic factor receptor RET drives haematopoietic stem cell survival and function ▶

 
 

Diogo Fonseca-Pereira, Sílvia Arroz-Madeira, Mariana Rodrigues-Campos et al.

 
 

Haematopoietic stem cells are direct targets for neurotrophic factors, indicating that haematopoietic stem cells and neurons are regulated by similar signals.

 
 
 
 
 
 

A long noncoding RNA protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy ▶

 
 

Pei Han, Wei Li, Chiou-Hong Lin et al.

 
 

Here, a long noncoding RNA, termed Mhrt, is identified in the loci of myosin heavy chain (Myh) genes in mice and shown to be capable of suppressing cardiomyopathy in the animals, as well as being repressed in diseased human hearts.

 
 
 
 
 
 

DNA-damage-induced differentiation of leukaemic cells as an anti-cancer barrier ▶

 
 

Margarida A. Santos, Robert B. Faryabi, Aysegul V. Ergen et al.

 
 

Histone methyl-transferase MLL4 is required for stem-cell activity and an aggressive form of acute myeloid leukaemia harbouring the MLL–AF9 oncogene.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Endothelial-cell FAK targeting sensitizes tumours to DNA-damaging therapy ▶

 
 

Bernardo Tavora, Louise E. Reynolds, Silvia Batista et al.

 
 

The tumour microenvironment can influence its response to anticancer therapies; here, the enzyme FAK in endothelial cells is shown to have a role in the induction of a number of cytokines during chemotherapy or irradiation, which in turn protect tumours from DNA-damaging agents.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Promoter sequences direct cytoplasmic localization and translation of mRNAs during starvation in yeast ▶

 
 

Brian M. Zid, Erin K. O’Shea

 
 

Transcription and translation are generally thought of as disconnected processes in eukaryotes; however, under starvation conditions in yeast, the promoter sequence influences not only messenger RNA levels but also several processes downstream of transcription, including the localization of mRNA within the cytoplasm and the translation rate of mRNA.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Sae2 promotes dsDNA endonuclease activity within Mre11–Rad50–Xrs2 to resect DNA breaks ▶

 
 

Elda Cannavo, Petr Cejka

 
 

The MRX complex, required for double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination, has 3′ to 5′ exonuclease activity, but homologous recombination at a DSB uses a 3′-tailed molecule, which requires resection of the 5′ strand; here it is shown that in yeast, Sae2 nuclease promotes MRX to make an initial endonucleolytic cut on the 5′ strand that may allow MRX to digest the 5′ strand back to the end in a 3′ to 5′ fashion.

 
 
 
 
 
 

News & Views

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

DNA repair: Making the cut ▶

 
 

Lorraine S. Symington

 
 
 
 
 
 

Medical research: Ebola therapy protects severely ill monkeys ▶

 
 

Thomas W. Geisbert

 
 
 
 
 
 

50 & 100 Years Ago ▶

 
 
 
 
 
 

Microbiology: An integrated view of the skin microbiome ▶

 
 

Patrick D. Schloss

 
 
 
 
 
 

Evolutionary biology: Survival of the fittest group ▶

 
 

Timothy Linksvayer

 
 
 
 
 
 

Immunology: Starve a fever, feed the microbiota ▶

 
 

Seth Rakoff-Nahoum, Laurie E. Comstock

 
 
 
 
 
 

Genomics: Of monarchs and migration ▶

 
 

Richard H. Ffrench-Constant

 
 
 
 
 
 

Lung disease: Treatment by cell transplant ▶

 
 

Mary Jane Thomassen, Mani S. Kavuru

 
 
 
 
 
 

Animal behaviour: Incipient tradition in wild chimpanzees ▶

 
 

Andrew Whiten

 
 
 
 
 
 

Brief Communications Arising

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Inhibition of demethylases by GSK-J1/J4 ▶

 
 

Bo Heinemann, Jesper Morten Nielsen, Heidi Rye Hudlebusch et al.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Kruidenier et al. reply ▶

 
 

Laurens Kruidenier, Chun-wa Chung, Zhongjun Cheng et al.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Another explanation for apparent epistasis ▶

 
 

Andrew R. Wood, Marcus A. Tuke, Mike A. Nalls et al.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Hemani et al. reply ▶

 
 

Gibran Hemani, Konstantin Shakhbazov, Harm-Jan Westra et al.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Corrigenda

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Corrigendum: Mammalian Y chromosomes retain widely expressed dosage-sensitive regulators ▶

 
 

Daniel W. Bellott, Jennifer F. Hughes, Helen Skaletsky et al.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Corrigendum: Hotspots of aberrant epigenomic reprogramming in human induced pluripotent stem cells ▶

 
 

Ryan Lister, Mattia Pelizzola, Yasuyuki S. Kida et al.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Research Highlights

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Ig Nobel prizes provide fun fodder | Palaeontology: Amphibian regrew limbs long ago | Neuroscience: Paralysed rats stimulated to walk | Cancer: Vitamin D boosts cancer treatment | Ecology: Dingo destruction okay for prey | Archaeology: Stone tools not out of Africa | Physiology: Ancient roots of daily rhythm

 
 
 
 

NEWS & COMMENT

 
 
 
 
 

Ebola outbreak shuts down malaria-control efforts | Books in brief | Genetics: The neighbourly nature of evolution | Preventative care: Lung-cancer screens now worth the cost | Psychosocial models: Focus on positive features of ageing | BRAIN gain | Fast genetic sequencing saves newborn lives | Biopiracy ban stirs red-tape fears | Forensic chemistry could stop African plant thieves

 
 
 
 
 
 

More Biological Sciences ▶

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Nature Communications soon to be fully open access: From 20th October Nature Communications, will become fully open access for all new submissions. If an author has a manuscript they wish to submit to the journal via the subscription route, they must submit before 20th October. After this date all new submissions, if accepted, will be published open access and an article processing charge (APC) will apply. For any questions on the switch, open access or advice on policies and funding, visit our website, read the press release or contact our dedicated support team at openaccess@nature.com

 
 
 
 
Health Sciences top
 
 
 
 
 
 

RESEARCH

 
 
 
 
 

Latest Online

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Lung disease: Treatment by cell transplant ▶

 
 

Mary Jane Thomassen, Mani S. Kavuru

 
 
 
 
 
 

Loss of signalling via Gα13 in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma ▶

 
 

Jagan R. Muppidi, Roland Schmitz, Jesse A. Green et al.

 
 

Inactivation of the S1PR2–Gα13–ARHGEF1 signalling pathway in mice allows Akt activation and promotes dissemination of germinal centre B cells, consistent with a role of function-disrupting mutations in the systemic dissemination of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Articles and Letters

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity ▶

 
 

Andriy Marusyk, Doris P. Tabassum, Philipp M. Altrock et al.

 
 

To investigate the role of sub-clonal tumour heterogeneity in cancer progression, a mouse xenograft model was used which revealed that tumour growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation by a non-cell-autonomous mechanism, although this minor subpopulation can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors.

 
 
 
 
 
 

A long noncoding RNA protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy ▶

 
 

Pei Han, Wei Li, Chiou-Hong Lin et al.

 
 

Here, a long noncoding RNA, termed Mhrt, is identified in the loci of myosin heavy chain (Myh) genes in mice and shown to be capable of suppressing cardiomyopathy in the animals, as well as being repressed in diseased human hearts.

 
 
 
 
 
 

DNA-damage-induced differentiation of leukaemic cells as an anti-cancer barrier ▶

 
 

Margarida A. Santos, Robert B. Faryabi, Aysegul V. Ergen et al.

 
 

Histone methyl-transferase MLL4 is required for stem-cell activity and an aggressive form of acute myeloid leukaemia harbouring the MLL–AF9 oncogene.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Endothelial-cell FAK targeting sensitizes tumours to DNA-damaging therapy ▶

 
 

Bernardo Tavora, Louise E. Reynolds, Silvia Batista et al.

 
 

The tumour microenvironment can influence its response to anticancer therapies; here, the enzyme FAK in endothelial cells is shown to have a role in the induction of a number of cytokines during chemotherapy or irradiation, which in turn protect tumours from DNA-damaging agents.

 
 
 
 
 
 

News & Views

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Medical research: Ebola therapy protects severely ill monkeys ▶

 
 

Thomas W. Geisbert

 
 
 
 
 
 

Lung disease: Treatment by cell transplant ▶

 
 

Mary Jane Thomassen, Mani S. Kavuru

 
 
 
 
 
 

Research Highlights

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Ig Nobel prizes provide fun fodder | Cancer: Vitamin D boosts cancer treatment

 
 
 
 

NEWS & COMMENT

 
 
 
 
 

Preventative care: Lung-cancer screens now worth the cost

 
 
 
 
 
 

More Health Sciences ▶

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Physical Sciences top
 
 
 
 
 
 

RESEARCH

 
 
 
 
 

Articles and Letters

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

HCN ice in Titan’s high-altitude southern polar cloud ▶

 
 

Remco J. de Kok, Nicholas A. Teanby, Luca Maltagliati et al.

 
 

The cloud that appeared above the south pole of Saturn’s satellite Titan in early 2012 is found to be composed of micrometre-sized particles of frozen hydrogen cyanide, indicating a dramatic cooling of Titan’s atmosphere to temperatures about 100 degrees less than predicted by atmospheric circulation models.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Experimental realization of universal geometric quantum gates with solid-state spins ▶

 
 

C. Zu, W.-B. Wang, L. He et al.

 
 

The manipulation of spins in a solid-state system — nitrogen–vacancy defects in diamond — allows the experimental realization of a universal set of geometric quantum gates using holonomies, that is, non-Abelian generalizations of the Berry phase, and offers a scalable platform with the potential for room-temperature quantum computing.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry ▶

 
 

Dimitris Sofikitis, Lykourgos Bougas, Georgios E. Katsoprinakis et al.

 
 

By passing light through a chiral sample — here vapours and solutions — in a specially designed ring cavity, the resulting chiral signals can be isolated from the achiral backgrounds and enhanced by a factor of more than 1,000, making them detectable in situations where conventional means of measurement fail.

 
 
 
 
 
 

News & Views

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Solar system: Not just a storm in a teacup ▶

 
 

Caitlin A. Griffith

 
 
 
 
 
 

Astronomy: The age of the quasars ▶

 
 

Daniel Mortlock

 
 
 
 
 
 

Research Highlights

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Ig Nobel prizes provide fun fodder | Nanotechnology: Microphone made from a molecule | Astrophysics: Space ripples could pump up stars

 
 
 
 

NEWS & COMMENT

 
 
 
 
 

Astronomy: To catch a cosmic ray | Computing history: Geeks, Inc. | Genetics: The neighbourly nature of evolution | Astronomy data bounty spurs debate over access | Forensic chemistry could stop African plant thieves

 
 
 
 
 
 

More Physical Sciences ▶

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earth & Environmental Sciences top
 
 
 
 
 
 

RESEARCH

 
 
 
 
 

Latest Online

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

High winter ozone pollution from carbonyl photolysis in an oil and gas basin ▶

 
 

Peter M. Edwards, Steven S. Brown, James M. Roberts et al.

 
 

Data from the oil- and gas-producing basin of northeastern Utah and a box model are used to assess the photochemical reactions of nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds that lead to excessive atmospheric ozone pollution in winter.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Articles and Letters

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Structure and evolution of the lunar Procellarum region as revealed by GRAIL gravity data ▶

 
 

Jeffrey C. Andrews-Hanna, Jonathan Besserer, James W. Head III et al.

 
 

Gravity data show a rectangular pattern of narrow linear anomalies bordering the lunar Procellarum region that are interpreted to be the frozen remnants of lava-filled rifts and underlying feeder dykes.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet ▶

 
 

Lauren C. Andrews, Ginny A. Catania, Matthew J. Hoffman et al.

 
 

Simultaneous observations of moulins and boreholes in western Greenland show that water delivery to the base of the ice sheet via moulins affects short-term ice velocity fluctuations, but not late-season ice velocity decelerations.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Prevalence of viscoelastic relaxation after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake ▶

 
 

Tianhaozhe Sun, Kelin Wang, Takeshi Iinuma et al.

 
 

Seafloor Global Positioning System observations immediately after the great 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake provide unambiguous evidence for the dominant role of viscoelastic relaxation in short-term postseismic deformation, rather than just afterslip on the fault as is commonly assumed.

 
 
 
 
 
 

News & Views

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Geoscience: The plumbing of Greenland's ice ▶

 
 

Peter Nienow

 
 
 
 
 
 

Solar system: Not just a storm in a teacup ▶

 
 

Caitlin A. Griffith

 
 
 
 
 
 

Research Highlights

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Palaeoclimate: Winds favoured Pacific exploration

 
 
 
 

NEWS & COMMENT

 
 
 
 
 

The first South Americans: Extreme living | Resources: Curb vast water use in central Asia | Climate policy: Ditch the 2 °C warming goal | Tibetan plateau gets wired up for monsoon prediction | Environment: Invest in renewable energy in Tibet | Water politics must adapt to a warming world | Forensic chemistry could stop African plant thieves

 
 
 
 
 
 

More Earth & Environmental Sciences ▶

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Special - Toolbox top
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Toolbox: Scientific writing: the online cooperative ▶

 
 

Collaborative browser-based tools aim to change the way researchers write and publish their papers.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A picture of health
n a series of four films reporter Lorna Stewart travels to the German island of Lindau to meet 600 of science’s brightest young minds and 37 rock stars – Nobel laureates. Watch the full series of films including this week’s release The long goodbye with Hans Rosling and Oliver Smithies.
Supported by Mars, Incorporated and published weeky from Sep 24th - Oct 15th 
 
 
 
 
Careers & Jobs top
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

At the bench: The right mix ▶

 
 

Staffing a lab is fraught with complexity, so new team leaders can learn a lot from the experience of others.

 
 
 
     
 
 
 

Turning point: Juan David Ramírez ▶

 
 

Colombian virologist leverages fellowship to fight infectious diseases in Latin America

 
 
 
 
 
 

Careers related news & comment

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Books in brief Barbara Kiser | Scientific misconduct: Research integrity guidelines in Japan Masanori Wada | Retraction challenges | Seven days: 26 September–2 October | Astronomy data bounty spurs debate over access Mark Zastrow

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

naturejobs.com

naturejobs.com Science jobs of the week

 
 
 

Research Associate / Fellow

 
 

The University of Nottingham 

 
 
 
 
 

PhD fellowship

 
 

Imperial College London 

 
 
 
 
 

Two Post doctoral researchers

 
 

The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) 

 
 
 
 
 

Nutrition Scientist

 
 

Nestlé Research Center (NRC) 

 
 
 
 

No matter what your career stage, student, postdoc or senior scientist, you will find articles on naturejobs.com to help guide you in your science career. Keep up-to-date with the latest sector trends, vote in our reader poll and sign-up to receive the monthly Naturejobs newsletter.

 
 
 
 
  Natureevents Directory featured events  
 
 
 
 

natureevents.com - The premier science events website

natureevents directory featured events

 
 
 
 

Stem cells: from basic research to bioprocessing

 
 

09.06.15 London, UK

 
 
 
 

Natureevents Directory is the premier resource for scientists looking for the latest scientific conferences, courses, meetings and symposia. Featured across Nature Publishing Group journals and centrally at natureevents.com it is an essential reference guide to scientific events worldwide.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Futures

 
     
 
 
 
 
 

Welcome to the world, Trilby Freedom ▶

 
 

Marcelina Vizcarra

 
 
 
 
     
 

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