Monday, June 26, 2017

Science X Newsletter Week 25

Dear Reader ,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for week 25:

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved

At EPFL, researchers challenge a fundamental law and discover that more electromagnetic energy can be stored in wave-guiding systems than previously thought. The discovery has implications in telecommunications. Working around the fundamental law, they conceived resonant and wave-guiding systems capable of storing energy over a prolonged period while keeping a broad bandwidth. Their trick was to create asymmetric resonant or wave-guiding systems using magnetic fields.

Extra-virgin olive oil preserves memory and protects brain against Alzheimer's: study

The Mediterranean diet, rich in plant-based foods, is associated with a variety of health benefits, including a lower incidence of dementia. Now, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) have identified a specific ingredient that protects against cognitive decline: extra-virgin olive oil, a major component of the Mediterranean diet. In a study published online June 21 in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, the researchers show that the consumption of extra-virgin olive oil protects memory and learning ability and reduces the formation of amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain—classic markers of Alzheimer's disease.

Deceleration of runaway electrons paves the way for fusion power

Fusion power has the potential to provide clean and safe energy that is free from carbon dioxide emissions. However, imitating the solar energy process is a difficult task to achieve. Two young plasma physicists at Chalmers University of Technology have developed a technology model that could lead to better methods for decelerating runaway electrons that could destroy a future reactor without warning.

Hubble captures massive dead disk galaxy that challenges theories of galaxy evolution

By combining the power of a "natural lens" in space with the capability of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers made a surprising discovery—the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang.

Forgetting can make you smarter

For most people having a good memory means being able to remember more information clearly for long periods of time. For neuroscientists too, the inability to remember was long believed to represent a failure of the brain's mechanisms for storing and retrieving information.

New algorithm generates folding patterns to produce any 3-D origami structure

In a 1999 paper, Erik Demaine—now an MIT professor of electrical engineering and computer science, but then an 18-year-old PhD student at the University of Waterloo, in Canada—described an algorithm that could determine how to fold a piece of paper into any conceivable 3-D shape.

Discovery could lead to sustainable ethanol made from carbon dioxide

Most cars and trucks in the United States run on a blend of 90 percent gasoline and 10 percent ethanol, a renewable fuel made primarily from fermented corn. But to produce the 14 billion gallons of ethanol consumed annually by American drivers requires millions of acres of farmland.

Treating autism by targeting the gut

Experts have called for large-scale studies into altering the make-up of bacteria in the gut, after a review showed that this might reduce the symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Until now, caregivers have relied on rehabilitation, educational interventions and drugs to reduce ASD symptoms, but now researchers suggest that treating this condition could be as simple as changing their diet.

Unseen 'planetary mass object' signalled by warped Kuiper Belt

An unknown, unseen "planetary mass object" may lurk in the outer reaches of our solar system, according to new research on the orbits of minor planets to be published in the Astronomical Journal. This object would be different from—and much closer than—the so-called Planet Nine, a planet whose existence yet awaits confirmation.

Study suggests memories that trigger anxiety, PTSD could be 'erased' without affecting normal memory of past events

Different types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and McGill University and published today in Current Biology.

Sound waves direct particles to self-assemble, self-heal

An elegantly simple experiment with floating particles self-assembling in response to sound waves has provided a new framework for studying how seemingly lifelike behaviors emerge in response to external forces.

Neuron transistor behaves like a brain neuron

(Phys.org)—Researchers have built a new type of "neuron transistor"—a transistor that behaves like a neuron in a living brain. These devices could form the building blocks of neuromorphic hardware that may offer unprecedented computational capabilities, such as learning and adaptation.

Ultra-thin camera creates images without lenses

Traditional cameras—even those on the thinnest of cell phones—cannot be truly flat due to their optics: lenses that require a certain shape and size in order to function. At Caltech, engineers have developed a new camera design that replaces the lenses with an ultra-thin optical phased array (OPA). The OPA does computationally what lenses do using large pieces of glass: it manipulates incoming light to capture an image.

Vaccine that lowers cholesterol offers hope of immunizing against cardiovascular disease

A vaccine to immunise people against high levels of cholesterol and the narrowing of the arteries caused by build-up of fatty material (atherosclerosis) may be possible following successful results in mice. Now, a phase I trial in patients has started to see if the findings translate to humans.

Subsidizing electric vehicles inefficient way to reduce CO2 emissions: study

Subsidizing the purchase of electric cars in Canada is an inefficient way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that is not cost effective, according to a Montreal Economic Institute study released Thursday.

Study answers why ketamine helps depression, offers target for safer therapy

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have identified a key protein that helps trigger ketamine's rapid antidepressant effects in the brain, a crucial step to developing alternative treatments to the controversial drug being dispensed in a growing number of clinics across the country.

Magnetic nanoknots evoke Lord Kelvin's vortex theory of atoms

(Phys.org)—In the late 1800s when scientists were still trying to figure out what exactly atoms are, one of the leading theories, proposed by Lord Kelvin, was that atoms are knots of swirling vortices in the aether. Although this idea turned out to be completely wrong, it ushered in modern knot theory, which today is used in various areas of science such as fluid dynamics, the structure of DNA, and the concept of chirality.

Prototype device enables photon-photon interactions at room temperature for quantum computing

Ordinarily, light particles—photons—don't interact. If two photons collide in a vacuum, they simply pass through each other.

Researchers discover brain inflammation in people with OCD

A new brain imaging study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) shows for the first time that brain inflammation is significantly elevated - more than 30 per cent higher - in people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) than in people without the condition. Published today in JAMA Psychiatry, the study provides compelling evidence for a new potential direction for treating this anxiety disorder, which can be debilitating for people who experience it.

Biologists discover the immune system can eliminate cells with too many or too few chromosomes

Most living cells have a defined number of chromosomes: Human cells, for example, have 23 pairs. As cells divide, they can make errors that lead to a gain or loss of chromosomes, which is usually very harmful.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you no longer want to receive this email use the link below to unsubscribe.
https://sciencex.com/profile/nwletter/
You are subscribed as jmabs1@gmail.com

ga

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Science X Newsletter Sunday, Jun 25

Dear Reader ,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for June 25, 2017:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Atomic imperfections move quantum communication network closer to reality

Chickens may illuminate how humans developed sharp daylight vision

Google to stop scanning Gmail for ad targeting

Cut US commercial building energy use 29 percent with widespread controls

Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements

Decades after the discovery of anti-obesity hormone, scant evidence that leptin keeps lean people lean, scientists say

Mars rover Opportunity on walkabout near rim

Brain-inspired supercomputing system takes spotlight in IBM, US Air Force Research Lab collab

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

Seeing with your ears: Novel acoustics project aims to improve virtual reality, explore ear shape effects on 3-D sound

Astronomy & Space news

Mars rover Opportunity on walkabout near rim

NASA's senior Mars rover, Opportunity, is examining rocks at the edge of Endeavour Crater for signs that they may have been either transported by a flood or eroded in place by wind.

SpaceX set to launch satellites from California air base

SpaceX is going for a weekend double-header with a planned launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, just two days after a successful satellite launch from Florida.

Technology news

Google to stop scanning Gmail for ad targeting

Google said Friday it would stop scanning the contents of Gmail users' inboxes for ad targeting, moving to end a practice that has fueled privacy concerns since the free email service was launched.

Cut US commercial building energy use 29 percent with widespread controls

Like driving a car despite a glowing check-engine light, large buildings often chug along without maintenance being performed on the building controls designed to keep them running smoothly.

Brain-inspired supercomputing system takes spotlight in IBM, US Air Force Research Lab collab

(Tech Xplore)—IBM and the Air Force Research Laboratory are working to develop an artificial intelligence-based supercomputer with a neural network design that is inspired by the human brain.

Seeing with your ears: Novel acoustics project aims to improve virtual reality, explore ear shape effects on 3-D sound

Paris' Cathedral of Notre Dame has a ghost orchestra that is always performing, thanks to a sophisticated, multidisciplinary acoustics research project that will be presented during Acoustics '17 Boston, the third joint meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the European Acoustics Association being held June 25-29, in Boston, Massachusetts.

CIA chief: Intel leaks on the rise, cites leaker 'worship'

CIA Director Mike Pompeo says he thinks disclosure of America's secret intelligence is on the rise, fueled partly by the "worship" of leakers like Edward Snowden.

UK Parliament investigates cyberattack on user accounts

British officials were investigating a cyberattack Saturday on the country's Parliament after discovering "unauthorized attempts to access parliamentary user accounts."

Pay-TV could lose 1 million customers this quarter, analyst says

Pay-TV operators could lose 1 million subscribers this quarter, a Wall Street analyst says.

Wearable technology could save lives and dollars in construction industry

At first glance, there's nothing remarkable about SolePower's latest work boot prototype.

China drone king turns to farming

China drone-maker DJI is betting on flying machines that shoot pesticide instead of photos to fend off growing competition in the global remote-controlled aircraft market.

The friendly honk: Acoustical remake of car horns alerts without jarring

Sound permeates the human experience—we are exposed to sounds from birth to death, and the human auditory system can distinguish and classify about 400,000 different sounds, according to some estimates. It is noise that gets our attention. Sometimes traumatically so.

Fewer than 90 accounts hit by UK parliament cyberattack

A "sustained and determined" cyberattack on Britain's parliament compromised fewer than 90 email accounts, a parliamentary spokesman said Sunday.

US investigates after lab improperly ships nuclear material

U.S. regulators said Friday they are launching an investigation into the improper shipment of nuclear material from the laboratory that created the atomic bomb to other federal facilities this week, marking the latest safety lapse for Los Alamos National Laboratory as it faces growing criticism over its track record.

Review: Aukey mechanical keyboard brings a dance party to your desktop

Some people like typing on a good old clickity-clack keyboard.

A risky fix to repair a city's gutted streetlight grid

For years, residents in this cash-strapped city watched helplessly as thieves gutted 33 miles (53 kilometers) of streetlight wiring, plunging long stretches of roadway into darkness. The thousands of dollars criminals pocketed at off-the-books salvage yards wreaked millions of dollars in damage.

Medicine & Health news

Decades after the discovery of anti-obesity hormone, scant evidence that leptin keeps lean people lean, scientists say

Discovered more than two decades ago, the hormone leptin has been widely hailed as the key regulator of leanness. Yet, the pivotal experiments that probe the function of this protein and unravel the precise mechanism of its action as a guardian against obesity are largely missing.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate safely through the environment using echolocation.

Targeted drug shows promise in rare advanced kidney cancer

Some patients with a form of advanced kidney cancer that carries a poor prognosis benefited from an experimental drug targeted to an abnormal genetic pathway causing cancerous growth, according to research led by a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientist.

Immunotherapy kinder than chemotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer

The immunotherapy nivolumab is kinder than chemotherapy for people with advanced head and neck cancer - easing many of the negative effects of the disease on patients' quality of life.

Fewer U.S. kids binge drinking

(HealthDay)—A new federal report finds that fewer U.S. teens and young adults are indulging in frat-party style drinking because their levels of binge drinking have gone down over the past six years.

A baby's skin no match for the sun

(HealthDay)—Want to help protect your children from skin cancer as they get older? Make sure they never get a serious sunburn in childhood.

Drug, herb interactions frequent for cancer patients

(HealthDay)—Patients with cancer frequently have herb-drug interactions (HDI) and drug-drug interactions (DDI), some of which have clinical consequences, according to research published online June 19 in the Journal of Oncology Practice.

Primary care pharmacy model attractive to patients

(HealthDay)—Patients express preference for a pharmacy-driven model of primary care versus a pharmacy offering minimal primary care services, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

Blood test can detect GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

(HealthDay)—A simple and rapid blood test can detect GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (DS), according to a study published online May 26 in the Annals of Neurology.

Anti-TNF-alpha Rx improves sleep quality in ankylosing spondylitis

(HealthDay)—Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy improves sleep quality (SQ) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) without any improvement in polysomnography (PSG) measures, according to a study published online May 29 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

High levels of brain inflammation seen in OCD

(HealthDay)—Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have high levels of brain inflammation, according to a study published online June 21 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Family history questionnaire ups genetic counseling for CRC

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy, a family history questionnaire (FHQ) sent by mail is associated with an increase in available family history and referral for genetic counseling, according to a study published online May 29 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

Surf's up! How to plan for a safe beach vacation

(HealthDay)—Heading to the beach this summer? Make safety part of your vacation planning.

Ob-gyns can help ID sex workers, improve access to care

(HealthDay)—Obstetrician-gynecologists can help improve recognition of sex workers and increase their access to preventive care, according to a Committee Opinion published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Review links conjugated linoleic acid supplementation to CRP

(HealthDay)—Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation is associated with an increase in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, according to a review and meta-analysis published online May 29 in Cardiovascular Therapeutics.

ACOG: shared decision-making key to breast cancer screening

(HealthDay)—Shared decision-making is being emphasized in new American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) mammography screening guidelines for women at average risk of breast cancer.

10 things you should ask your doctor on your next visit

Getting in to see a doctor takes time. Getting the most out of your doctor's time takes something more: an inquisitive approach.

Tiny bubbles offer sound solution for drug delivery

Your brain is armored. It lives in a box made of bones with a security system of vessels. These vessels protect the brain and central nervous system from harmful chemicals circulating in the blood. Yet this protection system—known as the blood-brain barrier—also prevents delivery of drugs that could help treat patients with brain cancers and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The heavily guarded brain has long frustrated physicians tending patients in need of brain treatments without surgery.

The new war on sepsis

Dawn Nagel, a nurse at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif., knew she was going to have a busy day, with more than a dozen patients showing signs of sepsis. They included a 61-year-old mechanic with diabetes. An elderly man recovering from pneumonia. A new mom whose white blood cell count had shot up after she gave birth.

Nevada's on-again, off-again marijuana sales back on

Nevada regulators reaffirmed Friday that they intend to issue licenses necessary for retailers to begin selling pot for recreational use on July 1, despite a court order that threatens to scuttle the plan.

UN: More than 200,000 suspected cholera cases in Yemen

The U.N. health agency says there are now more than 200,000 suspected cases of cholera in an outbreak in war-torn Yemen, many of them children.

Iran drug addicts double in six years

The number of drug addicts in Iran has more than doubled in six years, with opium the country's most popular narcotic, local media reported Sunday.

Biology news

Chickens may illuminate how humans developed sharp daylight vision

Humans belong to a select club of species that enjoy crisp color vision in daylight, thanks to a small spot in the center of the retina at the back of the eye. Other club members include monkeys and apes, various fish and reptiles, and many birds, which must home in on their scurrying dinners from afar or peck at tiny seeds.

New 3-D model predicts best planting practices for farmers

As farmers survey their fields this summer, several questions come to mind: How many plants germinated per acre? How does altering row spacing affect my yields? Does it make a difference if I plant my rows north to south or east to west? Now a computer model can answer these questions by comparing billions of virtual fields with different planting densities, row spacings, and orientations.

Panda mania hits Germany as China's cuddly envoys arrive

Germany had its first taste of panda mania on Saturday as two furry ambassadors arrived from China to begin a new life as stars of Berlin's premier zoo.

Q&A: Afraid of sharks? Flu, asteroids pose far greater risk

You might want a bigger boat, but you probably don't need better odds.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you no longer want to receive this email use the link below to unsubscribe.
https://sciencex.com/profile/nwletter/
You are subscribed as jmabs1@gmail.com

ga