Monday, May 15, 2017

Science X Newsletter Monday, May 15

Dear Reader ,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for May 15, 2017:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

AX J1910.7+0917 is the slowest X-ray pulsar, study finds

Best of Last Week – Violating Bell's inequality, oldest evidence of life on land and possibility of a cure for baldness

Tadpoles found to jump on backs of unknown adults to escape cannibalistic siblings

Frisky female fruit flies become more aggressive towards each other after sex

Quantum reservoir for microwaves

Grassy beginning for earliest Homo

Nano fiber feels forces and hears sounds made by cells

Researchers report new, more efficient catalyst for water splitting

Unfolding the folding mechanism of ladybug wings

Job report weighs in on technology disruption: Too much or too little?

Researcher finds 'kill switch' for cyberattack ransomeware

Manhunt for hackers behind global cyberattack (Update)

17 mummies discovered in central Egypt

Huge cyberattack forces Microsoft to offer free tech fix

An alert researcher, cooperation helped stem cyberattack

Astronomy & Space news

AX J1910.7+0917 is the slowest X-ray pulsar, study finds

European astronomers have found that an X-ray pulsar designated AX J1910.7+0917 has the slowest spin period among other objects in this class. The research team, led by Lara Sidoli of the National Institute for Astrophysics and Space Physics (INAF) in Milan, Italy, presented the new findings in a paper published May 4 on arXiv.org.

Researcher identifies key differences in solar wind models

The challenge of predicting space weather, which can cause issues with telecommunications and other satellite operations on Earth, requires a detailed understanding of the solar wind (a stream of charged particles released from the sun) and sophisticated computer simulations. Research done at the University of New Hampshire has found that when choosing the right model to describe the solar wind, using the one that takes longer to calculate does not make it the most accurate.

Variable winds on hot giant exoplanet help study of magnetic field

Senior Scientist Tamara M. Rogers of the Planetary Science Institute has discovered that substantial variability in the winds on the hot giant exoplanet HAT-P-7b are due to magnetism, and used those measurements to develop a new method to constrain the magnetic field of such an object.

New 'styrofoam' planet provides tools in search for habitable planets

Fifth-graders making styrofoam solar system models may have the right idea. Researchers at Lehigh University have discovered a new planet orbiting a star 320 light years from Earth that has the density of styrofoam. This "puffy planet" outside our solar system may hold opportunities for testing atmospheres that will be useful when assessing future planets for signs of life.

Image: X-ray sources in XMM-Newton's second slew catalogue

This colourful, seemingly abstract artwork is actually a map of our Galaxy, depicting all the celestial objects that were detected in the XMM-Newton slew survey between August 2001 and December 2014.

Mining the moon for rocket fuel to get us to Mars

Forty-five years have passed since humans last set foot on an extraterrestrial body. Now, the moon is back at the center of efforts not only to explore space, but to create a permanent, independent space-faring society.

NASA's EPIC view spots flashes on Earth

One million miles from Earth, a NASA camera is capturing unexpected flashes of light reflecting off our planet. The homeward-facing instrument on NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, launched in 2015, caught hundreds of these flashes over the span of a year. As keen observers from outside NASA wrote in, questioning the source of these lights, scientists deciphered the tiny cause to the big reflections: high-altitude, horizontally oriented ice crystals.

Technology news

Job report weighs in on technology disruption: Too much or too little?

Self-driving vans and trucks are only part of the labor puzzle. Robots that can mix drinks, make sandwiches, deliver pizzas, stock inventory and join assembly lines are only adding to the big question: Are we to be replaced in the labor market and how soon?

Researcher finds 'kill switch' for cyberattack ransomeware

A cybersecurity researcher appears to have discovered a "kill switch" that can prevent the spread of the WannaCry ransomware—for now—that has caused the cyberattacks wreaking havoc globally, they told AFP Saturday.

Manhunt for hackers behind global cyberattack (Update)

International investigators hunted Saturday for those behind an unprecedented cyber-attack that affected systems in dozens of countries, including at banks, hospitals and government agencies, as security experts sought to contain the fallout.

Huge cyberattack forces Microsoft to offer free tech fix

Teams of technicians worked "round the clock" Saturday to restore hospital computer systems in Britain and check bank or transport services in other nations after a global cyberattack hit dozens of countries and crippled the U.K.'s health system.

An alert researcher, cooperation helped stem cyberattack

The cyberattack that spread malicious software around the world, shutting down networks at hospitals, banks and government agencies, was stemmed by a young British researcher and an inexpensive domain registration, with help from another 20-something security engineer in the U.S.

Wave Swell Energy project to use its technology to harness power of waves

(Tech Xplore)—A system designed to harvest electricity from ocean waves is in the news.

Experts: Cyberattack havoc could grow as work week begins

An unprecedented "ransomware" cyberattack that has already hit tens of thousands of victims in 150 countries could wreak even more havoc Monday as people return to their desks and power up their computers at the start of the work week.

Technology edits voices like text

Anyone who ever used a typewriter will recall the difficulty of fixing a misspelled or poorly chosen word—remember whiteout and correction tape?

Diesel vehicles produce 50 percent more nitrogen oxide than originally thought

The research, led by the International Council on Clean Transportation and Environmental Health Analytics, LLC., in collaboration with scientists at the University of York's Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI); University of Colorado; and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, examined 11 major vehicle markets representing more than 80% of new diesel vehicle sales in 2015.'

Virtual top hats allow swarming robots to fly in tight formation

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have created a team of free-flying robots that obeys the two rules of the air: don't collide or undercut each other. They've also built autonomous blimps that recognize hand gestures and detect faces.

Apple to invest $200 million in scratch-resistant glass

Apple says it will invest $200 million in a rural Kentucky facility that it credits with rescuing the company's signature smartphone from a design flaw that would have led to scratched screens.

Explainer: What is ransomware?

Computers across the world were locked up Friday and users' files held for ransom when dozens of countries were hit in a cyber-extortion attack that targeted hospitals, companies and government agencies.

Dozens of countries hit by huge cyberextortion attack

Dozens of countries were hit with a huge cyberextortion attack Friday that locked up computers and held users' files for ransom at a multitude of hospitals, companies and government agencies.

UK working to restore hospital systems after cyberattack

Britain's National Cyber Security Center says teams are working "round the clock" to restore hospital computer systems after a global cyberattack that hit dozens of countries forced British hospitals to cancel and delay treatment for patients.

Organisations hit by global cyberattack

A huge range of organisations around the world have been affected by the WannaCry ransomware cyberattack, described by the EU's law enforcement agency as "unprecedented".

Nations battle cyberattack damages; UK focuses on hospitals

Teams of technicians worked "round the clock" Saturday to restore hospital computer systems in Britain and check transport services in other nations after a global cyberattack that hit dozens of countries crippled the U.K.'s health system. In Russia, where a wide array of systems came under attack, officials said services had been restored or the virus contained.

Cyberattack: major cyber attacks over the past 10 years

A huge range of organisations and companies around the world have been affected by the WannaCry ransomware cyberattack, described by the EU's law enforcement agency as "unprecedented".

Wal-Mart pushing hard to catch Amazon in e-commerce

Wal-Mart Stores, the 800-pound gorilla of retail, is running hard to catch up in an increasingly crucial segment where it is neither the biggest nor the best: e-commerce.

Red tape and taxes put brakes on 'Make In India' push

When Saurabh Ahuja tried to import a $600 3D printer for manufacturing drones in his Delhi workshop, he ended up spending another $900 in taxes and bribes and waited three months for it to clear customs.

Growing global cyberattack hits 200,000 victims so far

The unprecedented global cyberattack has hit more than 200,000 victims in scores of countries, Europol said Sunday, warning that the situation could escalate when people return to work.

Worldwide ransomware cyberattacks: What we know

Computers in more than 150 countries have been hit by what experts are calling an unprecedented mass cyberattack using ransomware.

Ransomware hits 'hundreds of thousands' of China PCs: firm

"Hundreds of thousands" of Chinese computers at nearly 30,000 institutions including government agencies have been hit by the global ransomware attack, a leading Chinese security-software provider has said, though the Asian impact has otherwise been relatively muted.

Microsoft says cyberattack should be wake up call for governments

Microsoft warned governments Sunday against storing computer vulnerabilities like the leaked one at the heart of the cyberattack that has crippled computers in more than 150 countries.

Lyft, Waymo to cooperate on self-driving cars

Waymo, the self-driving car unit of Google parent Alphabet, has reached an agreement with ridesharer Lyft to test self-driving car technology, the companies said.

The history of currency and counterfeiting in colonial America

Legitimate and counterfeit currency played a significant role in the Revolutionary War – either as a justification to start it or as part of a strategy to win it. However, to understand the economics of this time period, it is critical to know how colonial and counterfeit currency was produced, distributed, and utilized. To do this, new research at the University of Notre Dame will use historical data, the dates of production, and the composition of coins or the inks on paper currency to map out approximate geographic origins of the money, including counterfeit bills.

Photovoltaics and batteries—an expensive combination

Solar power can cover up to 40 percent of the electricity needs of a typical Belgian household. Going beyond that level becomes really expensive: using batteries coupled with solar panels would be twice as expensive as using the power grid. It is one of the conclusions from a research by ULB researchers recently published on Applied Energy.

New cyber chaos appears to have been avoided: Europol

European governments and companies appeared early Monday to have avoided further fallout from a crippling global cyberattack, the police agency Europol said.

Riding high: Toyota eyes 'flying car' future

Toyota has its sights set on a Blade Runner future as the Japanese automaker backs a move to launch a flying car in time for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

Self-healing tech charges up performance for silicon-containing battery anodes

Researchers at the University of Illinois have found a way to apply self-healing technology to lithium-ion batteries to make them more reliable and last longer.

Cyberattack wave ebbs, but experts see risk of more

The "ransomware" cyberattack that has hit companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity on Monday, though experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge.

HPC4MfG paper manufacturing project yields first results

Simulations run at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as part of a unique collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and an industry consortium could help U.S. paper manufacturers significantly reduce production costs and increase energy efficiencies.

Who's to blame for ransomware outbreak?

Questions are swirling over who is responsible for the security flaws exploited by hackers in the world's biggest ransomware attack to date, which crippled thousands of businesses and public organizations around the world. Here are some answers:

Medicine & Health news

Navigating the ethical clash between access to health information and proprietary databases

Sharing medical information, including genomic data, has the potential to benefit public health. However, companies that generate that information have a legal right to protect it as a trade secret. Legal and ethical conflict exists between individuals' right to access their personal health information and the protection of these trade secrets, as examined in Science by a group of ethicists from Baylor College of Medicine's Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy.

Researchers find a simple explanation for the typical patterns of nerve cells inside neural maps

The human brain consists of a highly complex network of approximately 85 billion nerve cells, which continually exchange information with each other. In order for this complex network to function efficiently, it is important that the distances between neurons encoding similar properties remain relatively short. In the human visual system and in that of many mammals, the neurons that respond to objects with similar orientation are indeed located near each other. Interestingly, such an ordered structure cannot be found in rodents. Researchers from the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, the Max-Planck-Institute for Brain Research and the Ernst-Strüngmann Institute for Neuroscience have studied why such differences between these animal species exist using two different computer models. Unexpectedly, the researchers found that the existence of this ordered structure is not only determined by the connectivity in the circuit, but also by the total number of neurons.

Researchers build brain on a chip

ANU researchers have developed a suitable material to allow brain cells to grow and form predictable circuits, which could lead to the development of prosthetics for the brain.

Identification of the neuronal suppressor of cataplexy, sudden weakening of muscle control in narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a disorder caused by losing orexin neurons, marked by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, and sudden weakening of muscle control. Previously, we found two kinds of neurons preventing narcolepsy by receiving information from orexin neurons. Here, researchers have discovered that serotonin neurons inhibit cataplexy by reducing amygdala activity, which controls emotion. The current discovery should lead to understanding of the mechanisms of narcolepsy and possible therapeutic approaches for cataplexy.

Diabetes drug may help symptoms of autism associated condition

A widely used diabetes medication could help people with a common inherited form of autism, research shows.

Certain immune reactions to viruses cause learning problems

Researchers have discovered a mechanism by which the body's immune reaction to viruses like influenza and HIV may cause learning and memory problems. This is the finding of a study led by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and published online May 15 in Nature Medicine.

Spinal muscular atrophy: New clues to cause and treatment

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive muscle wasting and paralysis, may be partly due to abnormalities in the synapses that connect sensory neurons and motor neurons, according to researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). Their study, conducted in mice, also showed that increasing the activity of these synapses alone can alleviate symptoms of SMA.

Tumor-trained T cells go on patrol

'Tumour-trained' immune cells - which have the potential to kill cancer cells - have been seen moving from one tumour to another for the first time. The new findings, which were uncovered by scientists at Australia's Garvan Institute of Medical Research, shed light on how immune therapies for cancer might work, and suggest new approaches to developing anti-cancer immune therapies.

Folk contraceptives lead researchers to drugs that block fertilization

Two chemicals found in anti-fertility folk medicines block a key step in fertilization—the meeting of egg and sperm—and may make effective alternatives to today's hormone-based contraceptives, which sometimes cause side effects.

Ebola: Lives to be saved with new management approach

Ebola outbreaks are set to be managed quickly and efficiently - saving lives - with a new approach developed by an international team of researchers, including the University of Warwick, which helps to streamline outbreak decision-making.

Study expands understanding of how the brain encodes fear memory

Research published by scientists at the University of California, Riverside on "fear memory" could lead to the development of therapies that reduce the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Long-term aspirin use doesn't lower risk of stroke for some a-fib patients

A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found that using long-term aspirin therapy to prevent strokes among patients who are considered to be at low risk for stroke may not be effective as previously thought.

Tibetan medicine lures patients seeking drug-free cures

Before dawn in the Indian Himalayas, scores of patients clutching small vials of urine queue patiently to see Yeshi Dhonden, a Tibetan monk who became a legend as personal healer to the Dalai Lama.

No need for travel restrictions in Congo Ebola outbreak, WHO says

An Ebola outbreak in Congo appears to be limited to a remote area, making travel or trade restrictions unnecessary for the time being, the World Health Organization said Saturday.

More states allow sunscreen at schools without doctor's OK

Susan Grenon makes sure her son is lathered with sunscreen before he leaves for school in the morning, but the fair-skinned 10-year-old can't bring a bottle to reapply it without a doctor's note.

115 dead as Yemen cholera outbreak spreads: ICRC

A cholera outbreak has rapidly spread in Yemen, killing 115 people in two weeks in the impoverished country where hospitals badly damaged by more than two years of war can barely cope.

Transplanting HCV+ kidneys into HCV- recipients feasible

(HealthDay)—In a research letter published online April 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine, Philadelphia doctors write that they have cleared hepatitis C infections in 10 patients who received kidneys from deceased donors who had the virus.

Personality may change when you drink, but less than you think

People typically report substantive changes to their personality when they become intoxicated, but observations from outsiders suggest less drastic differences between "sober" and "drunk" personalities, according to research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

BC's drug plan deductibles do not lower drug use for some seniors

Adding a modest 2% income-based deductible for prescription drugs did not appear to deter some seniors from filling prescriptions, found a study of British Columbia's public drug plan published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Market pressures and inadequate production are hampering access to essential antibiotics

Antibiotics used to treat a variety of common bacterial infections are becoming more difficult to access, mostly because the drugs are less profitable for manufacturers to produce and market.

Wasted nutrients: The result of widespread food waste

The extent of food waste in America is a cause for serious concern. It is estimated that around 1,217 calories per person per day are squandered. A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics looks beyond the caloric value of food waste and focuses on the nutritional value of the food we throw away. Investigators found that discarded food contains large amounts of key nutrients like vitamin D, fiber, and potassium that could help people get the food they need to meet their daily recommended intake.

Veterans with PTSD have an increased 'fight or flight' response

Young veterans with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have an increased 'fight or flight' response during mental stress, according to new findings published this week in the Journal of Physiology.

A path toward ending AIDS in the US by 2025

A new study describes an ambitious but feasible path toward what may have seemed unachievable just a decade ago: an end to the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. Using prevention surveillance data to model rates of HIV incidence, prevalence and mortality, investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health set targets, specifically a decrease in new infections to 21,000 by 2020 and to 12,000 by 2025, that would mark a transition toward ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Their findings are published in The American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Outdoor air temperature linked to risk of gestational diabetes

Outdoor air temperature has a direct link to the risk of gestational diabetes, with a 6% to 9% relative increase in the risk of diabetes for every 10°C increase in temperature, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal.

A mother's touch may help to bond with unborn babies

Babies may be able to recognise their mother's touch while still in the womb, helping them to bond even before birth, according to new research carried out at the University of Dundee.

Ventricular tachycardia reduced in patients with defibrillators

A drug approved to treat chest pain reduces the incidence of a common arrhythmia called ventricular tachycardia in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), according to a study presented today at the Heart Rhythm Society's annual meeting.

Swedish snus can be as damaging to the fetus as smoking

While it is well known that smoking while pregnant can damage the fetus, the effects of using Swedish snus (oral moist snuff) have been more mooted. Now, a new thesis from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that using snus while pregnant carries the same level of risk as smoking as regards to stillbirth, preterm birth, cleft lip and palate, and neonatal apnea. However, it pays off to quit using snus early in the pregnancy, before the first visit at the antenatal care, as doing so gives no observable increase in risk.

Why bad moods are good for you—the surprising benefits of sadness

Homo sapiens is a very moody species. Even though sadness and bad moods have always been part of the human experience, we now live in an age that ignores or devalues these feelings.

Study spotlights Indigenous children and serious burns injuries

More Indigenous children are going to hospital in NSW with serious burns than non-Indigenous children and they are less likely to be treated in a hospital in a paediatric burns unit, despite needing more intensive treatment and a longer stay.

Pediatric experts find aromatherapy effective for promoting infant healing, NAS recovery

Pulling away the seal of a fresh aromatherapy patch, Dr. John Daniel took a deep inhalation as the fragrance of lavender and chamomile essential oils permeated his surroundings.

Augmented reality app to help people manage type 2 diabetes & high blood pressure

Augmented reality will be incorporated into a new customised app for people with high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes to improve their understanding of the multiple medications they must use to manage their condition.

Novel surgical technique paves way to restoring failing organs

By piercing liver cells with rapid pulses of electricity, scientists at UC San Francisco have demonstrated an entirely new way to transplant cells into organs to treat disease.

Natural defense mechanism preventing cancer at the earliest stage

A new study shows cells in the initial stage of cancer change their metabolism before getting eliminated by the surrounding normal cells, providing a novel target for developing cancer prevention drugs.

Psychedelics in the lab and clinic—making up for lost time

Nearly 50 years ago, psychiatrists lost access to one of the most promising tools they'd found to study consciousness and treat a range of refractory psychological conditions: psychedelic drugs. Psychedelics were banned in the United States in 1970 and by the United Nations the next year, classified as Schedule I drugs with a "high potential for abuse" and "no currently accepted medical use." Many scientists blame Timothy Leary, the Harvard psychologist who became one of the most prominent psychedelic proselytizers of the sixties, for fueling both the drug's popularity and the media frenzy that inevitably triggered a legal backlash.

The AHCA and anencephaly

Last week I read with incredulity section 215 of the American Health Care Act, the part that states that it "does not include coverage for abortions (other than any abortion necessary to save the life of the mother or any abortion with respect to a pregnancy that is the result of an act of rape or incest)."

Study reveals prevalence of women with heart disease delivering babies is increasing

A study of more than 80,000 women with heart disease from 2003 to 2012 reveals that the prevalence of women with heart disease delivering babies increased by 24 percent over that 10-year period. This jump, reported in a Stony Brook University-led study to be published May 15 in the American Journal of Cardiology , may prompt greater awareness of heart disease in women of childbearing age, heighten individual screening of heart disease in pregnant patients, and institute a multidisciplinary approach to labor and delivery.

How El Niño forecasts can prevent cholera deaths in Africa

Since it first emerged from the Ganges River delta 200 years ago, cholera has killed tens of millions of people around the world. It causes acute diarrhea that can kill quickly without proper treatment. Before the 1970s it was not unusual for healthy adults to die of dehydration within days of infection, despite drinking large amounts of water.

Helping drug users get back to work, not random drug testing, should be our priority

Drug testing people on welfare, as proposed in this year's federal budget, is a blunt way of tackling problems drug users face when looking for work.

Researchers find lactose intolerance related to low vitamin D levels

New research from the University of Toronto shows that people genetically intolerant to lactose, the main sugar found in dairy, have lower blood levels of vitamin D than the general population.

Scientists study fly to develop better hearing aids

Ormia ochracea's sense of directional hearing is second to none in the animal kingdom.

A new molecular mechanism related to epilepsy and intellectual disability

Epilepsy and intellectual disability, which usually have their onset during childhood, are in some cases linked to mutations in the gene KIAA1202, which contains the information to produce the protein Shrm4. An international study published in Nature Communications, coordinated by Maria Passafaro, at the Institute of Neuroscience of the National Research Council (IN-CNR), demonstrated one possible mechanism by which these mutations could cause those pathologies.

Study finds that oxytocin enhances conformity

Hope you were nice to your mom on Mother's Day, because it turns out she was right all along: Hanging out with the wrong crowd can lead you to make bad decisions, and for the first time an ASU researcher has proved it and provided a theory to explain why.

Scientists pinpoint key bowel disease gene

A key gene that helps to explain an underlying cause of incurable bowel disorders such as Crohn's disease has been identified by scientists.

Study suggests few developmental effects of television on five-year-old children

Researchers from Newcastle University and Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, found that children who watch less than three hours of TV a day when they start in primary school are more likely to communicate their ideas effectively when they move on to secondary school.

How different are female, male and intersex genital cutting?

Three members of the Dawoodi Bohra sect of Islam were recently indicted on charges of "female genital mutilation" (FGM) in the US state of Michigan. In Norway, meanwhile, one of the major political parties has backed a measure to ban childhood male circumcision.

Scientists light the way for immune system to attack cancer

The science behind harnessing the immune system to fight cancer is complicated, but a University of Rochester Medical Center laboratory discovered a simple, practical way to use light and optics to steer killer immune cells toward tumors.

New research suggests more sensitive approaches to detect and monitor inflammatory bowel disease

A University of Manchester test on the mucus lining of the intestine, performed in mice, has found changes in bacteria that could lead to inflammatory bowel disease 12 weeks earlier than previously possible through looking at stool samples, leading to the possibility of earlier diagnosis and better management of the disease in humans.

More than 1/3 of parents would allow child to be in residential or hotel pool unsupervised

As kids get ready to splash around in pools this summer, some parents may underestimate drowning risks, suggests a new national poll.

Researchers identify hormone that is key to brain development in fruit flies

University of Oregon researchers using Drosophila have identified a steroid hormone that triggers a vital transition in early brain development in which neural stem cells properly change gears to produce different kinds of neurons.

Stem cell transplants may advance ALS treatment by repair of blood-spinal cord barrier

Researchers at the University of South Florida show in a new study that bone marrow stem cell transplants helped improve motor functions and nervous system conditions in mice with the disease Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier.

New gelatin devices that imitate the activity of the body in bone regeneration

Regenerative medicine is a discipline that is continually growing and encompasses a whole arsenal of therapeutic strategies, from recombinant proteins and stem cells right up to materials and matrices designed to release drugs and growth factors. The NanoBioCel group in the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Pharmacy has developed one of these scaffolds, or matrices, for cases of critical bone defects, like those that can generate themselves in situations such as burns, injuries or tumour extractions; these scaffolds are designed to temporarily replace the matrix of the bone and help to regenerate bone tissue.

New test for childhood genetic disorders 'transformational'

The gruelling way doctors are often forced to diagnose a group of rare genetic disorders in children could be transformed by a new test developed by The University of Manchester and Saint Mary's Hospital.

Latest figures on ICT sector worldwide and its R&D investment

The latest edition of the Prospective Insights in ICT R&D (PREDICT) report, by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), is now available. It provides the most complete and extensive analysis available of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) industries including their expenditure on research and development (R&D) in Europe and beyond, spanning from 1995 to the most recent year for which official statistics are available. The 20-years perspective over 40 countries offered by the report shows how the ICT sector has tripled in value added in the last 20 years, and the leading role of ICT services which represent 73.1% of the total value added of the ICT sector globally.

Pig model to help research on human knee growth, injury treatment

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have published research on how the knees of pigs compare to human knees at various stages of maturity—a finding that will advance research by this group and others on injury treatment in young people.

Exposure to psychological domestic abuse most damaging to children's wellbeing

Exposure to psychological abuse between parents is more damaging to children's wellbeing as they grow older than physical domestic violence, according to new research carried out at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland.

Stem-cell transplants show limited benefit for double-hit lymphoma patients in remission

Patients with double hit lymphoma (DHL) who undergo autologous stem-cell transplantation (autoSCT) after achieving remission are not more likely to remain in remission or live longer than patients who do not undergo autoSCT, according to a new analysis from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania. The study looked at long term outcomes for patients who achieved remission and, in most cases, found no clear benefit to the transplant, except potentially in patients who received standard front-line chemotherapy, who were less likely to remain in remission than those patients receiving intensive front-line chemotherapy. The findings are published this month in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Heart attack risk increases 17-fold following respiratory infections

The risk of having a heart attack is 17 times higher in the seven days following a respiratory infection, University of Sydney research has found.

New nationwide study indicates patients are often prescribed potentially futile drugs in their final

Older adults often receive drugs of questionable benefit during their last months of life, according to the first study conducted on the burden of end-of-life medications across an entire population. The authors advocate for clinical guidelines to support physicians when they face the decision to continue or discontinue medications near the end of life. Their findings are published in The American Journal of Medicine.

Making drug use a crime makes HIV prevention, treatment more difficult

The criminalization of drug use has a negative effect on efforts to prevent and treat people with HIV, suggests a review of published research conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of British Columbia.

New study examines sexual violence against college women with disabilities

Patterns of sexual violence and intimate partner violence aimed at female college students with a mental health-related or behavioral disability and the health effects of this abuse are presented in a new study published in Journal of Women's Health.

Does sleep duration affect cardiac metabolic risk in young children?

How many hours a day young children (1-3 years) sleep does not appear to affect their cardiometabolic risk (CMR) at ages 3-8, based on an assessment of factors including blood pressure and cholesterol and blood glucose levels. Most unexpectedly, less sleep was associated with increased levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL), the "good" form of cholesterol, as reported in a new study published in Childhood Obesity.

Pennsylvania hospital neurosurgeons perform first focused ultrasound treatment for essential tremor

John Lukens recently became the first patient in Pennsylvania to receive MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment (MRgFUS) for Essential Tremor (ET). At age 61, Lukens has suffered with bilateral Essential Tremor for roughly 10 years—a condition which left him with such significant shaking in his hands and arms that eating, shaving, and even writing with his dominant hand was very difficult. Now two weeks after the procedure, Lukens, who lives in Plymouth Meeting, Pa., says he's tremor-free in his right hand.

Corticosteroid treatment increases survival of preterm infants within hours

The effects of corticosteroid treatments on pregnant women facing preterm delivery to prevent infant death and morbidity have been thought to develop gradually over days. However, a new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and colleagues in the European EPICE project - coordinated by Inserm, Paris - suggests that survival and health gains for very preterm infants may occur within hours.

Strategy significantly boosts colorectal screening for groups with low rates

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have identified a strategy that doubled screening rates for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, among patient groups who historically have had lower rates.

Leaving segregated neighborhoods reduces blood pressure for blacks

The systolic blood pressure readings of African-Americans dropped between one to five points when they moved to less segregated neighborhoods, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.

High blood pressure linked to racial segregation in neighborhoods

Living in racially segregated neighborhoods is associated with a rise in the blood pressure of black adults, while moving away from segregated areas is associated with a decrease —and significant enough to lead to reductions in heart attacks and strokes, a National Institutes of Health-funded study has found.

What is survival among patients with Parkinson, Dementia with lewy bodies?

A new article published by JAMA Neurology compares survival rates among patients with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson disease dementia and multiple system atrophy with parkinsonism, with individuals in the general population.

Could there be a better way to estimate body fat levels in children, adolescents?

Reducing childhood obesity is an international effort and central to that effort is being able to accurately determine which children and adolescents are overweight. Body mass index (BMI) is used worldwide to screen for obesity, but since BMI does not work as well in children, BMI z scores are used instead to classify children and adolescents as normal weight, overweight or obese based on their BMI percentile.

New collaborative care model focuses on full recovery of those injured after age 50

An estimated 1.4 million Americans over age 50 are hospitalized for severe injuries annually—most often due to motor vehicle crashes or falls. The majority have the potential for full recovery from the trauma, yet a large percentage do not reach their full potential. With the support of a new $2.5 million, five-year award from the National Institute on Aging, implementation scientists from Indiana University and the Regenstrief Institute are testing the Trauma Medical Home, a novel collaborative care model they have developed to facilitate a full physical, psychological and cognitive recovery for injured individuals over 50.

Where you live may impact how much you drink

Neighborhoods with greater poverty and disorganization may play a greater role in problem drinking than the availability of bars and stores that sell hard liquor, a University of Washington-led study has found.

New blood test is more accurate in predicting prostate cancer risk than PSA

A team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and other clinical sites have demonstrated that a new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures - distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease.

Scientists develop revolutionary eye drops to treat age-related blindness

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have developed a type of eye drop which could potentially revolutionise the treatment of one of the leading causes of blindness in the UK.

Researchers uncover potential risks of common MS treatment

In one of the most comprehensive studies to date, UBC researchers have identified potential adverse reactions of a commonly used multiple sclerosis drug.

Two dose HPV vaccine effective in treating genital warts, study finds

As of this year, kids under the age of 15 only need 2 doses of HPV vaccine. New research out of Boston Medical Center, published online in the STD Journal, is the first published clinical evidence to support new recommendations by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for a two-dose HPV vaccine to prevent genital warts. BMC researchers found that the two-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides the same level of protection against genital warts as three doses, when given as directed.

New gene identified in Lou Gehrig's disease

For the first time, a variant in UBQLN4 gene has been associated with Lou Gehrig's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) - a progressive disease resulting in the loss of nerve cells that control muscle movement, which eventually leads to paralysis and death. The study published in the journal eLife also describes how this gene variant disrupts a cellular process that drives motor neuron development. This new insight opens the door to potential treatment targets for ALS.

New finding affecting immune reconstitution related to B cells

Researchers from the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles examined the mechanisms of B cell immune reconstitution in pediatric patients who had undergone bone marrow transplantation and discovered a disruption in the maturation of B cells - critical to the immune system - preventing the production of antibodies that fight infection. The results of the study were published in the journal Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation on May 12.

Epilepsy drug therapies to be improved by new targeted approach

New research from the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with the Mario Negri Institute in Milan, published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, has identified a protein that could help patients with epilepsy respond more positively to drug therapies.

Researchers deliver first 'nanotherapeutics' to tumor

For the first time, WSU researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. The innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy tissues.

Nonprescription use of Ritalin linked to adverse side effects, study finds

New research from the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions that explored the potential side effects of the stimulant drug Ritalin on those without ADHD showed changes in brain chemistry associated with risk-taking behavior, sleep disruption and other undesirable effects.

Skin cancer on the rise

New diagnoses for two types of skin cancer increased in recent years, according to a Mayo Clinic-led team of researchers.

LGB-focused resources help stressed teens cope

"It gets better." These three words have become a pop-culture mantra for struggling young people in the gay and lesbian community.

Ebola survivors have a 'unique' retinal scar

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have conducted a study of Ebola survivors to determine if the virus has any specific effects on the back on the eye using an ultra widefield retinal camera.

Shift work may put damper on a man's sex life

(HealthDay)—Male shift workers listen up: Two new studies link sleep disorders common in these men to urinary problems and erectile dysfunction.

A new way to avoid an embarrassing male sexual problem?

(HealthDay)—Men troubled by the embarrassment of premature ejaculation might soon have an easy way to avoid it, new research suggests.

Timing of menopause may affect heart failure risk

(HealthDay)—Women who entered menopause early or who never gave birth might have an increased risk of heart failure, a new study suggests.

Bike fanatics shouldn't worry about effects on sexual health

(HealthDay)—The groin pain and numbness some serious bicyclists experience isn't harmful to their sexual or urinary health, two new studies suggest.

Fewer SIDS deaths in U.S., but gaps among racial groups remain

(HealthDay)—Fewer U.S. babies are dying from SIDS, but certain minorities remain at greater risk, a new study finds.

Getting back on track with exercise

(HealthDay)—Sometimes life gets in the way of your workout plans. Maybe an illness or an injury got you off track or you took a break from the gym that lasted a little too long. Getting moving again can be challenging, but it's certainly doable—and worthwhile.

Warning against domperidone use for lactating women

(HealthDay)—The dopamine receptor antagonist domperidone, which may increase milk production in lactating women, is associated with serious cardiac risks, and should not be used for lactation enhancement, according to a commentary published in the June issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Leadless pacemaker feasible in animal models

(HealthDay)—A leadless anti-tachycardia pacemaker (LP) and subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) are feasible in animal models, according to a study published online May 12 in JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the Heart Rhythm Society, held from May 10 to 13 in Chicago.

Chronic rhinosinusitis linked to increased risk for cholesteatoma

(HealthDay)—Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is associated with increased risk for cholesteatoma, according to a study published online May 11 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

Free incubators save lives of Indonesian babies

Tiny Indonesian baby Maryamah stared around from inside an incubator, her bright eyes swivelling left and right from under a woollen hat that was far too big for her.

Drug testing welfare recipients raises questions about data profiling and discrimination

The Australian government's proposed random drug test trial for welfare recipients is not so random.

Cholera outbreak in war-ravaged Yemen kills 115

The U.N. humanitarian coordinator in Yemen says a cholera outbreak has killed 115 people over the past two weeks.

Simple post-surgery step significantly reduces bladder cancer recurrence

It's just one step. Flushing the bladder with a common chemotherapy drug after a cancerous tumor is surgically removed reduces the chances of that cancer returning. Canadian and European clinical trials have proven this true and now a major U.S. study has done the same.

Parents support policies to limit teens' access to indoor tanning

Research led by Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute found that almost two-thirds (65%) of parents of adolescents agreed with policies to ban indoor tanning for youth under age 18. About one-quarter of parents had no opinion (23%), and only 12% disagreed. Support for an indoor tanning ban was high across racial/ethnic groups and geographic regions of the U.S. The study appears online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Pembrolizumab in non-small cell lung cancer: Hint of considerable added benefit

In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has already formed metastases, the suitable treatment depends, among other factors, on the genes that are activated in the tumour cells and whether mutations have occurred that make certain treatments ineffective. Already since July 2016, the monoclonal antibody pembrolizumab (trade name: Keytruda) has been available for second-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC in adults whose tumours express the T-cell receptor ligand PD-L1 and who have received a prior chemotherapy regimen. Following extension of approval, the drug can also be used in first-line treatment if at least half of the tumour cells produce PD-L1 and, in addition, the tumours have no activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK).

Biology news

Tadpoles found to jump on backs of unknown adults to escape cannibalistic siblings

A pair of researchers, one with Vrije Universiteit Brussel and the other Trier University in Germany has found that splash-back poison frog tadpoles willingly seek out any adult that comes near them to escape their cannibalistic siblings. In their paper published in Journal of Zoology, Lisa Schulte and Michael Mayer describe their study of the tadpoles in a field laboratory they set up in northeastern Peru, what they found, and why they believe the tadpoles behave as they do.

Frisky female fruit flies become more aggressive towards each other after sex

Frisky female fruit flies become more aggressive towards each other after sex.

Unfolding the folding mechanism of ladybug wings

Japanese scientists have figured out how ladybugs fold their wings by transplanting a transparent artificial wing onto the insect and observing its underlying folding mechanism. The study's findings, which help explain how the wings can maintain their strength and rigidity during flight, while becoming elastic for compact folding and storage on the ground, provide hints for the innovative design of a wide range of deployable structures, from satellite antennas to microscopic medical instruments to articles for daily use like umbrellas and fans.

What makes an animal clever? Research shows intelligence is not just about using tools

Humans set themselves apart from other animals in a number of ways, including our ability to make tools. When the anthropologist Jane Goodall discovered that wild chimpanzees frequently make and use tools, her advisor Louis Leakey famously quipped that "now we must redefine tool, redefine man, or accept chimpanzees as humans".

Migratory birds arriving late to breeding grounds

New research shows climate change is altering the delicate seasonal clock that North American migratory songbirds rely on to successfully mate and raise healthy offspring, setting in motion a domino effect that could threaten the survival of many familiar backyard bird species.

Unborn rays traumatized when their mothers are captured, study finds

The stress of unintentional fishing capture has a detrimental impact not only on pregnant rays, but also their unborn offspring, research that is the first of its kind in the world has found.

Gladiator games: In the natural world, biodiversity can offer protection to weaker species

If you pit a pair of gladiators, one strong and one weak, against each other 10 times the outcome will likely be the same every time: the stronger competitor will defeat the weak. But if you add into the field additional competitors of varying strength levels, even the weakest competitors might be able to survive—if only because they're able to find a quiet corner to hide.

A carnivorous plant's prized genetic treasures, unveiled

The carnivorous humped bladderwort plant is a sophisticated predator. Living in swamps and ponds, it uses vacuum pressure to suck prey into tiny traps at breathtaking speeds of under a millisecond.

Begging blue tit nestlings discriminate between the odour of familiar and unfamiliar peers

Nestling blue tits can discriminate between the smell of other nestlings and adapt their begging behaviour accordingly. This is the outcome of the latest study by Dr. Barbara Caspers and Dr. Peter Korsten from Bielefeld University to be published today on the 12th of May in the journal Functional Ecology. The behavioural biologist Caspers is currently studying odour discrimination in various animals.

Why do some graziers want to retain, not kill, dingoes?

Vast, ancient, nutrient-poor, with wild swings between droughts, floods and fires: this describes much of the Australian continent. Livestock grazing and farming in such a land is certainly not without its challenges.

Iodine ensures successful solution of biomolecule structures

An international team including researchers from MIPT has shown that iodide phasing—a long-established technique in structural biology—is universally applicable to membrane protein structure determination. Knowledge of these structures enables a molecular-level understanding of the workings of eyesight and smell, as well as the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

More genes turned on when plants compete

Some people travel to northern California for wine. However, Maren Friesen, Michigan State University plant biologist, treks to the Golden State for clover.

Researchers develop a more precise and controlled method of engineering tissues from stem cells

Nothing beats nature. The diverse and wonderful varieties of cells and tissues that comprise the human body are evidence of that.

Code of conduct needed for ocean conservation, study says

A diverse group of the world's leading experts in marine conservation is calling for a Hippocratic Oath for ocean conservation ? not unlike the pledge physicians take to uphold specific ethical standards when practicing medicine.

Albino orangutan named 'Alba' after global appeal

A conservation group said Monday it has chosen the name Alba for a rare albino orangutan rescued from captivity in Indonesia after receiving a flood of suggestions from the public.


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1 comment:

Tanya Hilbert said...

With ALS,(amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) my first sign that something was wrong, was my slurred speech. And then the inability to eat without getting choked, strangled, and coughing. I didn't have health care I just thought it was a stroke, When it started to get worse I went to a neurologist. I was given medications like riluzole oral to slow down the progress of the disease, nothing was really working to help my condition. Finally i started on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis herbal formula i purchased from Health Herbal Clinic, i read alot of positive reviews from other patients who used the ALS herbal treatment. I used the herbal remedy for 7 weeks, its effects on ALS is amazing, all my symptoms gradually faded away, i feed very more freely by myself now! (Visit www. healthherbalclinic. net or email at Info@ healthherbalclinic. net) I recommend this ALS herbal formula for all ALS Patients.