Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Science X Newsletter Wednesday, Mar 29

Dear Reader ,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for March 29, 2017:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

Continuous breathing metal-organic framework with guest selectivity

Researchers control soft robots using magnetic fields

Social bees have kept their gut microbes for 80 million years

Wrong-way asteroid plays 'chicken' with Jupiter

Man with quadriplegia employs injury bridging technologies to move again—just by thinking

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizes

Seabird bones, fossils reveal broad food-web shift in North Pacific

Cattle associated antibiotics disturb soil ecosystems

Subaru telescope detects shadow of gas cloud in ancient proto-supercluster

Japan scientist eyes energy burst from 'typhoon turbine'

US lawmakers roll back privacy rules for internet carriers

Products can be pals when you're lonely, but it may cost you, study finds

Cats found to like humans more than thought

Startup develops app to detect irregular heartbeats that can cause strokes

Researchers program RNA nanoparticles that could protect against Zika

Astronomy & Space news

Wrong-way asteroid plays 'chicken' with Jupiter

For at least a million years, an asteroid orbiting the "wrong" way around the sun has been playing a cosmic game of chicken with giant Jupiter and with about 6,000 other asteroids sharing the giant planet's space, says a report published in the latest issue of Nature.

Subaru telescope detects shadow of gas cloud in ancient proto-supercluster

A team led by researchers from Osaka Sangyo University, with members from Tohoku University, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and others, has used the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope to create the most-extensive map of neutral hydrogen gas in the early universe. This cloud appears widely spread out across 160 million light-years in and around a structure called the proto-supercluster. It is the largest structure in the distant universe, and existed some 11.5 billion years ago. Such a huge gas cloud is extremely valuable for studying large-scale structure formation and the evolution of galaxies from gas in the early universe, and merits further investigation.

Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matter

Research conducted by scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology rules out a challenge to the accepted standard model of the universe and theory of how galaxies form by shedding new light on a problematic structure.

Two possible landing sites for ExoMars mission

The ExoMars mobile rover, tasked with recovering evidence of life on the Red Planet, will touch down in 2021 at one of two sites, scientists announced Wednesday.

Imperial instrument ready to study the sun

Imperial's contribution to the Solar Orbiter mission, which will go closer to the sun than anything so far, is ready to fly after extensive testing.

How plants are grown beyond Earth?

Following a new NASA bill, passed in March by the US Congress and which authorizes $19.5 billion spending for space exploration in 2017, manned missions to Mars are closer to reality than ever before.

Next stop: A trip inside the Sun's atmosphere

Every so often the sun emits an explosive burst of charged particles that makes its way to Earth and often wreaks havoc on power grids, aircraft and satellite systems. When clouds of high-speed charged particles come racing off the sun, they can bathe spacecraft, astronauts and planetary surfaces in damaging radiation. Understanding why the sun occasionally emits these high-energy particles can help scientists predict space weather. Knowing when solar energetic particles may hit Earth can help people on the planet take precautions.

Seeing the whole galaxy with a 'second eye on the sky'

Earlier this month, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) reached an important milestone by opening its "second eye on the sky" – a new instrument called the "APOGEE South spectrograph."

NASA laser communications to provide Orion faster connections

NASA is working to forever change the way astronauts communicate to and from space using an advanced laser communications system called LEMNOS, which will enable exponentially faster connections than ever before.

Image: Norwegian fjords captured by Proba-V

Snow-dusted Norwegian fjords imaged by ESA's Earth-observing Proba-V minisatellite.

Technology news

Japan scientist eyes energy burst from 'typhoon turbine'

Most people look for a place to hide when a typhoon is on the horizon, but Atsushi Shimizu hopes that the fury of nature may one day help resource-poor Japan tackle its energy woes.

US lawmakers roll back privacy rules for internet carriers

US lawmakers voted Tuesday to roll back rules that would block internet service providers from selling user data to third parties, following a heated debate over privacy protections.

Startup develops app to detect irregular heartbeats that can cause strokes

The signs of certain diseases or health conditions can sometimes appear on people's faces: Pale eyelids may indicate anemia, a yellow tinge to the skin could signal jaundice, and cracked lips may be a warning sign of diabetes.

Neural network creates dance moves for Dance Dance Revolution

(Tech Xplore)—A trio of researchers with the University of California has trained a neural network to create dance moves (step charts) for the open source version of the video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR.) Chris Donahue, Zachary Lipton and Julian McAuley have written a paper describing their efforts and uploaded it to the preprint server arXiv.

Windows update will bring 3-D, game tools and doodling

A major update to Microsoft's Windows 10 system will start reaching consumers and businesses on April 11, offering 3-D drawing tools, game-broadcasting capabilities and better ways to manage your web browsing.

Samsung's Galaxy S8 phone aims to dispel the Note 7 debacle

Samsung seems to be playing it safe —at least with its battery—as it unveils its first major smartphone since the embarrassing recall of its fire-prone Note 7.

Optane memory from Intel set to impress in responsiveness for PCs

(Tech Xplore)—This week technology watchers peering under the PC hood have been talking about the Monday announcement by Intel; it is to offer its Optane memory product for PCs. What's the big deal? The product offers a generous gift of responsiveness and speed, apparently.

What the death of broadband privacy rules means

Now that both houses of Congress have voted to block Obama-era broadband privacy rules , what does that mean for you?

Engineers test heated pavement technology at Des Moines International Airport

Iowa State University's Halil Ceylan picked up his smartphone, opened up an app and called up the remote controls for the first full-scale test slabs of electrically conductive concrete installed at an American airport.

Report warns of hacking risk to U.S. electric grid, oil pipelines, and other critical infrastructure

In a world where hackers can sabotage power plants and impact elections, there has never been a more crucial time to examine cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, most of which is privately owned.

New report shines light on installed costs and deployment barriers for residential solar PV with energy storage

Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are making available the most detailed component and system-level cost breakdowns to date for residential photovoltaic (PV) solar systems equipped with energy storage-and quantifying previously unknown soft costs for the first time.

Creating waterproof concrete

Water is concrete's ultimate enemy. Although concrete withstands constant beatings from cars and trucks, water can break it down, pooling on its surface and infiltrating the tiniest cracks. Add freezing and thawing cycles, and it's no wonder roads need frequent repairs.

Secrecy obligation for the digital piggy bank

"Do you collect bonus points?" This question is part of daily purchasing routine. More than 80% of German households participate in bonus programs. They run the risk of disclosing sensitive information about themselves, if such a system is misused. For this reason, the Cryptography and Security Group of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) develops a digital bonus and payment system that protects anonymity of clients, but also offers the added values desired by operators.

E-gloves to protect workers from dangerous vibration levels

Gloves embedded with tiny sensors are being developed by Nottingham Trent University to help protect construction workers from exposure to vibration.

Interior positioning system for dynamic environments

There is no positioning technology, such as GPS, for the indoor area. This makes location at shipyards, for instance, very difficult. In ship building, the environment changes constantly as a result of the construction process. Moreover, the metallic environment inhibits wireless communication that is required for location. Now, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), in cooperation with Meyer Werft and VOMATEC Innovations, has developed a new system to locate persons in a dynamic environment inside a hall under the SchiV 3.0 project.

Cubic photometer makes light in a room visible

Light determines how we see the world. Take a golf ball: we can see the shine on it, make out the structure or even perceive it as a flat disk because in a certain light we cannot see any shadow. Knowledge of light and how we perceive it can help designers to make our life and work easier. Measurements made with a cubic photometer and software have now been used to make a systematic analysis of the light in a room. Sylvia Pont, appointed as Antoni van Leeuwenhoek professor in 2016 for her work in the Perceptual Intelligence lab (PI or π-lab), will present her research during her inaugural lecture on Friday 31 March.

Cold spray technology to repair surfaces of corroded aircraft parts

Faster, market competitive and safer airplane repairs. That's the goal of a project by The University of Akron and Airborne Maintenance and Engineering Services in obtaining Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval for "cold spray" repair of corroded and worn parts on commercial aircraft.

Google Translate app now unblocked in China

Google on Wednesday made available in China a new version of its translation app that is accessible without censor-evading software, a move likely to fuel speculation that the internet giant was mending fences with Beijing.

Turkish court blocks Booking.com travel website

A Turkish commercial court has ordered the blocking of travel website Booking.com over alleged unfair competition its hotel and flight reservations platform may pose to local firms, the Association of Turkish Travel Agencies, Tursab, said Wednesday.

Toshiba says Westinghouse files for bankruptcy protection

Japan's embattled Toshiba Corp. said Wednesday that its U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse Electric Co. has filed for bankruptcy protection, marking a key step in its struggles to stop the flow of massive red ink.

Flexible electronic devices with roll-to-roll overmolding technology

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has, for the first time, performed all manufacturing stages for a flexible in-moulded LED foil with a roll-to-roll process. The purpose of this demo is to prove the suitability of the technique for the highly cost-effective manufacture of products such as flexible LED displays containing printed electronics.

Etihad to lend US-bound passengers iPads as ban workaround

One Mideast airline affected by the ban on most electronics in the cabins of U.S.-bound flights will lend iPads to its top-paying travelers.

Officials dedicate OSC's newest, most powerful supercomputer

J.C. "Jesse" Owens possessed both elite speed and raw power, which he honed and blended on his way to winning four Olympic gold medals in 1936.

Medicine & Health news

Man with quadriplegia employs injury bridging technologies to move again—just by thinking

Bill Kochevar grabbed a mug of water, drew it to his lips and drank through the straw.

Sick stem cells point to better MS drugs

Doctors seeking a cure for an aggressive form of multiple sclerosis keep chasing a mirage: no matter how well a drug works in the lab, it never seems to help many patients in the clinic. But after closely examining stem cells from patients and their families, researchers think they know why the drugs coming out of labs are duds. Neuroscientist Dr. Stephen Crocker, associate professor in the Department of Neuroscience at UConn Health, and colleagues offer an explanation in the Feb. 1 issue of Experimental Neurology.

Stem cell transplants offer hope for sufferers of gut disorders

After a baby is born, a souvenir of its months in the womb is usually not long to follow. Its first poo, or meconium, is a lump sum of everything the foetus has ingested for months; a dark sludge, compared by the insomniac readers of parenting forums to engine oil or tar.

Study finds a novel target molecule to help prevent brain damage from hemorrhagic strokes

With more than 130,000 victims nationwide, strokes are among the leading causes of death in the U.S. each year. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds, with a death every four minutes. But for those who survive, strokes can have a devastating impact, from loss of mobility or speech to severe brain damage.

New multiple sclerosis drug, backed by 40 years of research, could halt disease

A newly approved drug that is the first to reflect the current scientific understanding of multiple sclerosis (MS) – is holding new hope for the hundreds of thousands Americans living with the disease.

New way of screening potential treatments for tuberculosis

Scientists from LSTM's Research Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics (RCDD) have described in a paper published today in Scientific Reports, a new way of screening potential treatments for Tuberculosis (TB) which may assist in the identification and prioritisation of new therapies which could potentially reduce the duration of current TB treatment.

Study finds natural chemical helps brain adapt to stress

A natural signaling molecule that activates cannabinoid receptors in the brain plays a critical role in stress-resilience—the ability to adapt to repeated and acute exposures to traumatic stress, according to researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Fat-like molecules induced by cold help to turn on calorie-burning fat and improve metabolism in mice

Activated by cold, the small amounts of brown fat scattered around your body can burn calories to warm you up. They also can help to lower insulin resistance and other conditions implicated in type 2 diabetes and obesity. Since the discovery in 2009 that brown fat can be active in adult humans, researchers around the world have worked to unveil ways to switch on this fat. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have identified a new route to throw the switch.

Eating peanuts may lead to supple arteries and healthy hearts

Eating peanuts with a meal may help protect against cardiovascular diseases which can lead to heart attacks and stroke, according to an international team of researchers.

Blood test unlocks new frontier in treating depression

Doctors for the first time can determine which medication is more likely to help a patient overcome depression, according to research that pushes the medical field beyond what has essentially been a guessing game of prescribing antidepressants.

Brain scans show dopamine levels fall during migraine attacks

Using PET scans of the brain, University of Michigan researchers showed that dopamine falls and fluctuates at different times during a migraine headache.

Cardiac arrest patients do better if taken immediately to a specialist heart center

People who suffer cardiac arrest outside of hospital have a better chance of survival if they are taken immediately to a specialist heart centre rather than to the nearest general hospital, according to research published today (Wednesday) in the European Heart Journal. The study found that distance needed to travel to a specialist heart centre was not linked to better or worse risk of death.

Vulnerability to psychosis: How to detect it

A new study has identified an early vulnerability brain marker for psychosis. A research team led by University of Montreal and Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center shows that an exaggerated emotional response from the brain to non-threatening and non-emotional cues predicts the emergence of the first signs of psychotic symptoms in late adolescence. The results of this study were published on March 21 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Olympus' redesigned scope linked to infection outbreak

Doctors have tied a superbug outbreak at a foreign health facility to a medical scope that Olympus modified last year in an attempt to reduce its risk of spreading bacteria between patients.

Dying patients want easier access to experimental drugs. Experts say that's bad medicine

Former firefighter Mike DeBartoli is a man desperate to rescue himself. He suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the degenerative nerve disorder better known as Lou Gehrig's disease, which usually kills within five years. He has already spent one year in a clinical trial, taking four pills a day that may have been a placebo. It didn't help.

Researchers discover newborn rats hold secret to manufacturing human heart cells

Human heart muscle cells can be created in the lab, but researchers have been unable to grow the immature cells to the point where they could be useful.

We're losing our hearing. And it's only going to get worse.

Can you hear me? Maybe not.

Hepatitis B and C can be wiped out in the US by 2030; here's how

Health experts have devised an aggressive plan to stamp out a viral disease that is fueling a sharp rise in liver cancer in the United States and killing 20,000 Americans per year.

Florida's Zika battle plan includes beefing up public labs, mosquito control

South Florida's battle plan for Zika, expected to rebound with the rainy season, includes more boots on the ground to inspect and fumigate for mosquitoes, more lab resources to speed up test turnaround times and the promise of a more collegial collaboration between the federal and state governments.

Elon Musk's latest target: Brain-computer interfaces

Tech billionaire Elon Musk is announcing a new venture called Neuralink focused on linking brains to computers.

Immune cell therapy on liver cancer using interferon beta produced with stem cells

Causes of the most common form of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), include hepatitis B or C, cirrhosis, obesity, diabetes, a buildup of iron in the liver, or a family of toxins called aflatoxins produced by fungi on some types of food. Typical treatments for HCC include radiation, chemotherapy, cryo- or radiofrequency ablation, resection, and liver transplant. Unfortunately, the mortality rate is still quite high; the American Cancer Society estimates the five-year survival rate for localized liver cancer is 31 percent.

Team unveils new TGF-beta functions in liver cancer

Recent research results from the TGF-beta and cancer research group at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) provide a better understanding of the role of the TGF-beta cytokine in liver cancer. The work, published in Cancer Letters, shows how the TGF-beta cytokine is able to modulate not only the migratory capacity of the hepatocellular carcinoma cell, but also its capacity as a tumor initiator cell.

Children born to single mothers benefit when biological father joins family

Some of the negative consequences on the wellbeing of a child born to a single mother can be reduced if their biological father joins and stays with the family according to new research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

Video: How animal research helps us understand a devastating condition

OCD can be a devastating condition: therapy and medication often doesn't work, leaving many people unable to hold down a job or a relationship – or even to leave their house. In our series of films, science writer David Adam looks at how research at Cambridge using animals helps us understand what is happening in the brain – and may lead to better treatments.

Study shows how BPA may affect inflammatory breast cancer

The chemical bisphenol A, or BPA, appears to aid the survival of inflammatory breast cancer cells, revealing a potential mechanism for how the disease grows, according to a study led by researchers in the Department of Surgery at Duke University School of Medicine and the Duke Cancer Institute.

An old drug with new potential: WWII chemical-weapon antidote shows early promise as treatment for spinal cord injuries

A drug developed during World War II as an antidote for a chemical warfare agent has been found to be effective at suppressing a neurotoxin that worsens the pain and severity of spinal cord injuries, suggesting a new tool to treat the injuries.

Brain changes in older adults increase risk for scams

Older adults who have been scammed by friends, relatives or strangers seem to behave just like elders who have avoided rip-offs. They are able to balance their checkbooks. They can remember and evaluate information. Their personalities are normal, and their arithmetic is fine.

Research could lead to test strips for early cervical cancer detection

Purdue researchers are developing technology that could lead to the early detection of cervical cancer with low-cost, easy-to-use, lateral flow test strips similar to home pregnancy tests.

Gene research gives new insight into pancreatic cancer

One reason pancreatic cancer has a particularly low survival rate is the difficulty in getting drugs to the tumour, but new knowledge of how pancreatic cancer cells invade neighbouring cells could change that.

Trust, satisfaction high in consensual open relationships

Monogamy is considered by many to kindle commitment, trust and love, but a new University of Michigan study finds that those in nonmonogamous relationships are just as happy.

'Quake brain' affects memory and ability on simple tasks

Cantabrians' cognitive abilities – or their ability to do simple tasks – appear to have been significantly affected by exposure to earthquakes, new research from the University of Otago, Christchurch, has found.

Walking football enriches lives

New research from Abertay University has found organised football sessions have a direct improvement on the lives of people with mental health conditions like schizophrenia and bi-polar disorder.

Smartphone app developed to manage drinking

New Zealanders who want to self-manage their "hazardous" drinking may soon have a smartphone app to help them.

Look into my eyes—why those who experience hypnosis are unlikely to be faking it

New research from scientists at the University of Sussex has taken a major step towards unlocking the secrets of hypnosis and gathering evidence that suggests that subjects aren't faking the effects of it.

More evidence that statins could prevent blood clots in the veins

Further evidence has been found by Universities of Leicester and Bristol researchers to suggest statins could "significantly reduce" the occurrence of blood clotting in certain parts of the body.

Tropical medicine researchers show malaria prophylaxis is effective when the timing is right

Over 100 million travelers from temperate regions visit malaria-risk areas every year. Some 30,000 become infected with the pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, which is spread by the Anopheles mosquito. Malaria takes its deadly toll on the local population also; especially on high-risk groups such as children and pregnant women. There are various drugs available which can prevent malaria. But some can have serious side effects; others must be taken every day to be effective. Forgetting to take the anti-malaria tablets is currently the biggest risk factor for travelers when it comes to contracting the disease. Researchers headed by Professor Peter Kremsner and Dr. Benjamin Mordmüller at the Institute of Tropical Medicine of the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have run the first clinical trials on a new agent, DSM265. In a study supported by MMV (Medicines for Malaria Venture) and the DZIF, healthy volunteers were infected with malaria parasites after taking the new active substance; DSM265 demonstrated a good prophylactic effect. The study has been published in the medical journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

FDA approves first-in-human trial for neural-enabled prosthetic hand system developed at FIU

Upper extremity amputees are one step closer to successfully picking up a cookie or an egg, thanks to a new advanced prosthetic system that is designed to restore sensation.

New study shows HPV vaccine is reducing rates of genital warts

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was introduced in Australia in 2007 and New Zealand in 2008 to prevent cervical cancer. It was free for women up to age 26 in Australia and to all women under 20 in New Zealand. This is because 99.7% of cervical cancers are associated with the sexually transmissible infection.

From artificial tears to anti-glare screens—five tips for workplace eye wellness

Whether you work in an office, staring at a computer screen for eight hours a day, or on a construction site, amid flying sparks and sawdust, it's important to protect your eyes from occupational hazards.

Not all sexually abused and exploited children are groomed

Not all children who are sexually exploited are groomed, and the increasing tendency to link exploitation with grooming means some cases are being missed, a Cardiff University academic argues in a new book.

A brain scan to tell if you're depressed—and what treatment is needed

We currently diagnose depression based on what individuals tell us about their feelings – or those of their loved ones. People with depression usually describe feeling sad or say they are unable to enjoy the things they used to. But in many cases they don't actually realise that they are clinically depressed – or feel uncomfortable talking to a health professional about it.

Music therapy reduces pain in spine surgery patients

Music therapy has been found to decrease pain in patients recovering from spine surgery, compared to a control group of patients who received standard postoperative care alone. The study, published in The American Journal of Orthopedics, included a team of researchers from The Louis Armstrong Center for Music and Medicine and the Mount Sinai Department of Orthopaedics. About 70 percent of people in the United States experience at least one episode of back pain in their lifetime, and more than 5 million are temporarily or permanently disabled by spinal disorders.

Choosing a simpler path to drug discovery

Drug discovery is in essence the designing of compounds to interact with disease-related proteins. And in many recent development efforts, this process increasingly relies on "big data" and complex "deep learning", requiring the harnessing of supercomputing power. But what if this could be done much more simply, requiring less time and expense?

Heart failure and skilled nursing facilities: The importance of getting the facts

For many people diagnosed with heart failure—which almost invariably results in a hospital stay—the next stop is a skilled nursing facility. While their physician often will reassure them that it's just for a short time until they can get back to their home, in reality, that stay is long (averaging 144 days). And often they find themselves back in the hospital and back to a nursing facility again.

Scientists discover new category of analgesic drugs that may treat neuropathic pain

New research published online in The FASEB Journal suggests that a novel therapeutic target called LPCAT2 may prove effective against pain that is not receptive to the current treatments. This study has also revealed the existence of a platelet alleviating factor (PAF) pain loop, suggesting a possible role for PAF-receptor antagonists.

Adults with migraines have triple the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder

Generalized anxiety disorder is much more common among adults who have migraines than those without migraine (6% vs. 2%), according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto.

Studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

From using fluid in the lungs to better understand the potential of immunotherapy treatments in lung cancer, to tracking circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer, to conducting RNA sequencing of cancer cell clusters from the blood of pancreatic cancer patients, to finding new ways to biopsy tissue from patients who may have esophageal cancer, a series of studies from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrate the promise of new diagnostic methods. Three of the studies focus on liquid biopsies, an innovation which uses blood tests instead of surgical procedures in hopes of detecting cancer. Each research team will present their findings during the 2017 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Vaginal estriol gel helps women recover after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse is estimated to affect up to one-half of all women, causing pain and interfering with sexual function. A new study demonstrates how an ultralow dose of vaginal estriol gel used before and after pelvic organ prolapse surgery can improve recovery time and results. The study outcomes are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

Asthmatic schoolchildren are 'uncomfortable' using their inhalers

Poor asthma control and knowledge are common in children with doctor-diagnosed asthma, according to research by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Infant vitamin B1 deficiency leads to poor motor function and balance

A new Tel Aviv University study published in Maternal and Child Nutrition found that infantile Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency severely affected the motor function of preschoolers who were fed faulty formula in the first year of their lives. The conclusions were based on a retrospective study of children who received Remedia, an Israeli formula brand completely lacking in Vitamin B1, in 2004.

Study: Apixaban superior to warfarin for reducing brain bleeds in patients with AFib

In a new analysis, patients with atrial fibrillation showed a substantially reduced risk of dangerous bleeding in the brain, known as intracranial hemorrhage, when taking the newer anticoagulant apixaban compared to those taking warfarin.

FDA approves first drug for aggressive multiple sclerosis

U.S. regulators have approved the first drug for an aggressive kind of multiple sclerosis that steadily reduces coordination and the ability to walk.

Kids peppered with pot ads

(HealthDay)—There has been an alarming increase in young Americans' exposure to marijuana ads as more states legalize the drug, a new study contends.

TV ads for ACA enrollment linked to decline in uninsured rates

(HealthDay)—The volume of insurance advertisements during the first Affordable Care Act enrollment period correlated with change in uninsurance rates, with a higher volume of television advertisements linked to declines in uninsurance, according to a study published online March 15 in Health Affairs.

Surgery to remove unaffected breast in early breast cancer increases

The proportion of women in the United States undergoing surgery for early-stage breast cancer who have preventive mastectomy to remove the unaffected breast increased significantly in recent years, particularly among younger women, and varied substantially across states. A new study co-led by the American Cancer Society and published in JAMA Surgery finds nearly half of young breast cancer patients in five states undergoing the procedure.

Prevalence of heroin use rises in decade, greatest increase among whites

Heroin use and heroin use disorder have increased significantly among American adults since 2001, according to new research conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The portion of Americans using heroin has climbed five-fold in the last decade, and clinically defined heroin dependence has more than tripled. Increases were greatest among males, whites, those with low income and little education, and for heroin use disorder, in younger individuals. The increase in the prevalence of heroin use disorder was more pronounced among whites ages 18-44 than among non-whites and older adults.

Electronic health records improve weekend surgery outcomes

Electronic health record (EHR) systems significantly improve outcomes for patients who undergo surgeries on weekends, according to a Loyola Medicine study published in JAMA Surgery.

Gum disease, tooth loss may increase postmenopausal women's risk of death

Gum disease and tooth loss may be associated with a higher risk of death in postmenopausal women but not increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Hepatitis B and C may be linked to increased risk of Parkinson's disease

The viruses hepatitis B and C may both be associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the March 29, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The hepatitis virus affects the liver.

Immunologic changes point to potential for clinical investigation of combination immunotherapy for deadly kidney cancer

Immunologic changes observed in an early study of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC) raised the possibility for a larger clinical study of combination immunotherapy, according to findings reported by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Bullies and their victims obsessed with weight-loss

School bullies and their victims are more obsessed with weight-loss than anyone else, according to new research by the University of Warwick.

Adults with disabilities screened less often for colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the United States, with nearly 135,000 cases reported in 2016. The likelihood of surviving colorectal cancer is strongly related to the stage in which it is diagnosed. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine looked at screening adherence rates and found that individuals with certain disabilities are less likely to receive recommended preventive screenings. The researchers hope the finding will lead to targeted interventions and increased awareness for these individuals.

New research explains why even targeted therapies eventually fail in lung cancer

Nearly 50 years into the "war" on cancer, doctors possess weapons that once would have seemed magical in their tumor-killing specificity. The drug Tarceva (erlotinib), for example, can virtually erase all traces of aggressive lung cancer tumors in a subset of patients who bear a particular disease-driving mutation in a gene called EGFR.

TBI in emergency departments a substantial economic burden

A new study that looked at nearly 134,000 emergency department visits for traumatic brain injury, including concussion, during a one year period in Ontario estimated that those visits had a total cost of $945 million over the lifetimes of those patients.

Trauma and stress in teen years increases risk of depression during menopause, study shows

Although depression is common during a woman's transition to menopause, understanding who is at-risk of experiencing major depressive disorder (MDD) during this period of hormonal fluctuation were previously unknown. Now, a new study shows that women who experience multiple traumatic events during childhood or adolescence have a significantly increased risk of depression in the years leading into menopause (known as perimenopause). In particular, women who experienced their first traumatic event in their teens are especially susceptible to depression during perimenopause, even if they had previously never had depression. Conducted by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the study is the first to focus on the role of childhood adversity in the onset of MDD during the menopause transition, and how the onset of MDD might be affected based on when the traumatic event occurred. Results are published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

Virtual reality therapy helps decrease pain in hospitalized patients

Virtual reality therapy is effective in significantly reducing pain for hospitalized patients, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study.

Software-based system improves the ability to determine the cause of ischemic stroke

Determining the cause of an ischemic stroke - one caused by an interruption of blood supply - is critical to preventing a second stroke and is a primary focus in the evaluation of stroke patients. But despite that importance, physicians have long lacked a robust and objective means of doing so. Now a team of investigators at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the MGH Stroke Service have developed a software package that provides evidence-based, automated support for diagnosing the cause of stroke. Their study validating the package - called Causative Classification of Stroke (CCS) - was published online in JAMA Neurology.

Climate change's toll on mental health

When people think about climate change, they probably think first about its effects on the environment, and possibly on their physical health. But climate change also takes a significant toll on mental health, according to a new report released by the American Psychological Association and ecoAmerica entitled Mental Health and Our Changing Climate: Impacts, Implications, and Guidance.

How math could make bones stronger

They may seem rigid and set in their ways, but your bones are actually under constant construction and deconstruction. They give up their nutrient treasures (calcium) to the body and then rebuild in a constant give-and-take sort of rhythm.

Pregnancy risks upped in women with intellectual disability

(HealthDay)—Pregnant women with intellectual and developmental disabilities are at increased risk for adverse maternal and offspring outcomes, according to a study published in the April issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

DAPT cessation patterns vary with diabetes status after PCI

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after percutaneous coronary intervention with a drug-eluting stent (DES), DAPT cessation is significantly lower in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a study published in the March 27 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Childhood adiposity linked to later risk of fatty liver disease

(HealthDay)—Childhood adiposity is associated with increased odds of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to a study published online March 29 in Pediatrics.

Very low frequency electromagnetic field exposure linked to motor neurone disease

Workplace exposure to very low frequency electromagnetic fields may be linked to a doubling in risk of developing the most common form of motor neurone disease—amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS for short—suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Nurse volunteer activities improve the health of their communities, workforce study says

More than 20,000 nurses currently serve as volunteers with the American Red Cross, supporting victims of natural and man-made disasters. Many tens-of-thousands more nurses are also informally promoting healthy behaviors in community-based settings where people live, work, learn, and play by volunteering and fostering a day-to-day culture of health in their communities.

Meningitis outbreak kills nearly 270 in Nigeria: officials

Nearly 270 people, most of them children, have died in the past five months during the latest meningitis outbreak to hit Nigeria, public health officials said Wednesday.

Can childhood obesity be prevented before conception?

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and MetroHealth System researcher, along with Cleveland Clinic's director of metabolic research, have received federal funding to determine if childhood obesity can be prevented before women become pregnant.

New research comes to terms with old ideas about canker sores

A burning pain sensation – and treatments that do not work. This is what daily life is like for many of those who suffer from recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Research from the Sahlgrenska Academy now sheds new light on the reasons behind this condition found in the mouth.

UN: Malaria outbreak kills over 4,000 in Burundi this year

An outbreak of malaria has killed over 4,000 people in Burundi so far this year, the United Nations said Wednesday, a dramatic rise over the 700 victims the government announced just two weeks ago.

Study finds one in eight Calgary homes exceed Health Canada's acceptable radon level

Radon gas is a colourless, odourless radioactive gas that has been linked to lung cancer. Now, University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, researchers have proven it's prevalent throughout southern Alberta and in Calgary area homes. Undertaking one of the largest Canadian municipal studies to date, Aaron Goodarzi, PhD and his team tested radon levels in more than 2,300 Calgary and area homes. The results show that there is no unaffected neighbourhood. The study is published in today's CMAJ Open.

A novel molecular link between cholesterol, inflammation and liver cancer

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly disease with no effective cure that develops in the context of liver diseases associated with chronic inflammation. A recent research article published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine describes how important a protein called c-Fos is for HCC development, because it affects cholesterol homeostasis in hepatocytes, the main cells of the liver. Using genetically modified mouse models (GEMMs), Erwin Wagner, director of the Cancer Cell Biology Programme at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), and his Genes, Development and Disease (GDD) team experimentally document how c-Fos modulates premalignant hepatocyte transformation and how this is linked to cholesterol and inflammation. Maintaining healthy cholesterol levels in the organism is therefore important for preventing liver cancer.

Pharmacist care for Canadians with hypertension would save more than $15.7 billion

A new study shows that comprehensive long-term pharmacist care for Canadians with hypertension, including patient education and prescribing, improves health outcomes and will save money for Canada's cash-strapped health care system. Projected cost savings would be more than $15.7 billion if full scope pharmacist care were administered to the full eligible population in Canada.

Scientific discovery opens new possibilities for cancer and fibrosis treatment

Researchers from the Turku Centre for Biotechnology (BTK) in Finland have discovered that a cellular fuel sensor, known to control energy processes in the cells, is involved in the regulation of the contact of cells with their surrounding environment. This unexpected link could help scientists better understand life-threatening diseases, such as cancer and tissue fibrosis.

NHGRI oral history collection features influential genomics researchers

A collection of oral history videos released today by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) features candid conversations with pioneering genomics researchers and an interactive discussion with the institute's three directors to date.

Poll: Americans dislike GOP's, Trump's plan on health care

Note to President Donald Trump and House Republicans: People really don't like your approach to overhauling America's health care. If you're hoping to revive the effort, you may want to try something different.

Biology news

Social bees have kept their gut microbes for 80 million years

About 80 million years ago, a group of bees began exhibiting social behavior, which includes raising young together, sharing food resources and defending their colony. Today, their descendants—honey bees, stingless bees and bumble bees—carry stowaways from their ancient ancestors: five species of gut bacteria that have evolved along with the host bees.

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizes

Changes in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Seabird bones, fossils reveal broad food-web shift in North Pacific

For thousands of years, the Hawaiian petrel has soared over the Pacific Ocean, feeding on fish and squid. Now, using evidence preserved in the birds' bones, scientists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and Michigan State University have discovered that the now endangered seabird has experienced a significant shift in food resources most likely during the past 100 years—a disruption that may be due to industrial fishing practices.

Cats found to like humans more than thought

(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with Oregon State University and Monmouth University has conducted experiments with cats, and has found that they appear to like humans more than expected. In their paper published in the journal Behavioral Processes, Kristyn Vitale Shreve, Lindsay Mehrkam and Monique Udell describe their experiments and their plans for conducting additional experiments to better understand cat motivations.

How non-muscle cells find the strength to move

Researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore (MBI) at the National University of Singapore have described, for the first time, the ordered arrangement of myosin-II filaments in actin cables of non-muscle cells. This work was published in Nature Cell Biology in January 2017.

New approach improves potential HIV vaccine

By engineering an on/off switch into a weakened form of HIV, University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers have enhanced the safety and effectiveness of a potential vaccine for the virus that has killed approximately 35 million people during the past 35 years.

Programming human cells to follow sets of logical instructions

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Boston University has developed a new way to engineer mammalian cells that allows for programming them to behave in desired ways. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the team describes their technique and where they believe such technology is heading.

Birds hit by cars are, well, bird-brained

What's the difference between birds that get killed by cars, and those that don't?

Sex-shifting fish: Growth rate could determine sea lamprey sex

Unlike most animals, sea lampreys, an invasive, parasitic species of fish damaging the Great Lakes, could become male or female depending on how quickly they grow, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study published today.

For microbes fighting viruses, a fast response means a better defense

In battles between germs, the opening shot is often an injection. A virus, intent on infecting a microbe, punctures the cell's protective wall and inserts its own genetic code. New research from The Rockefeller University reveals how microbes act quickly to fend off the incoming threat using CRISPR, a bacterial immune system that also serves as a powerful tool for editing genomes.

From Beethoven to Bieber, why playing music to chimps is falling on deaf ears

Playing music to captive chimpanzees has no positive effect on their welfare, researchers have concluded.

A bird's blind spot plays an important role in its vision

The width of a bird's visual binocular field is partially determined by the size of the blind area in front of its head, according to a study published March 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Luke Tyrrell and Esteban Fernández-Juricic from Purdue University, USA.

Researchers identify genes that give cannabis its flavor

UBC scientists have scanned the genome of cannabis plants to find the genes responsible for giving various strains their lemony, skunky or earthy flavors, an important step for the budding legal cannabis industry.

Hope for elephants as ivory prices fall: conservation group

The price of ivory has fallen by nearly two-thirds in the last three years, according to research conducted in China and published on Wednesday by the conservation group Save the Elephants.

Motherhood is full of challenges—even for bird supermoms

Motherhood is full of challenges. Mums need to look after not only themselves but also their offspring: mothers make sure the young have good food, healthy and develop well, and they need to shelter the young from harsh environment, nasty neighbours and hungry predators. In addition, mums need to keep a watchful eye on their partners: as an eminent neurobiologist puts it, from the mother's point of view the husband is just yet another – not necessarily grown-up – offspring.

Night parrot rediscovery in WA raises questions for mining

The Night Parrot is unquestionably one of Australia's most enigmatic, elusive and enthralling species. The final frontier of Australian ornithology, this cryptic parrot eluded dedicated expeditions to find it for nearly half a century.

Researchers examine how supporting pollinators helps agriculture

When agriculture helps pollinators, pollinators help agriculture, according to a research review published today by an international group of experts, including a University of Idaho researcher.

Viruses in the oceanic basement

A team of scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) showed for the first time that many novel viruses are present in the fluids circulating deep in the rocky crust of the seafloor known as the ocean basement. Their recently published study also provides evidence that the viruses are actively infecting the many unusual microorganisms that live in the basement.

Testing effects of 'noise' on the decision-making abilities of slime mold

Foraging abilities of the amoeboid slime mold Physarum polycephalum may be improved by "noise" in the form of intermittent light exposure, according to a study published March 29, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Bernd Meyer from Monash University, Australia, and colleagues.

Kids' wildlife preferences differ from island to mainland

Growing up on an island or mainland location can shape the way children think about wildlife, including which species they prefer, according to North Carolina State University research. Comparison surveys of children living in the Bahamas and in North Carolina reveal significant differences and potential challenges for wildlife-conservation efforts on islands.

Study reveals listeria bacteria can hide inside tissue of romaine lettuce

A Purdue University study shows that the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can live inside the tissue of romaine lettuce, suggesting that conventional post-harvest sanitization practices might not be sufficient to kill the potentially lethal pathogen.

Scientists establish the first semen collection from saltwater crocodiles in Malaysia

Saltwater crocodiles are not endangered, but their natural range has been greatly reduced. Formerly dominant in estuaries throughout South-East Asia, they now roam wildly in only a handful of countries. Habitat loss and deadly conflict with humans threaten the crocodiles' future in this fast-developing region.

Rescue of 11 Asian elephants in Cambodia

The rescue of 11 Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) from a mud hole inside the Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary, Mondulkiri Province, Cambodia, on 24th March 2017 avoided a tragedy for wildlife conservation in Cambodia.

Genome editing in human cells

New techniques in molecular biology that enable targeted interventions in the genome are opening up promising new possibilities for research and application. The ethical and legal ramifications of these methods, known as "genome editing" and "genome surgery," need to be discussed throughout society, particularly with regard to research on human cells. The German Embryo Protection Act prohibits research on human embryos in Germany. However, the act, last amended in 2011, does not cover all issues raised by these new methods in genome surgery. To foster discussion on these issues in Germany, an interdisciplinary group of experts from the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina has written a Discussion Paper titled "Ethical and legal assessment of genome editing in research on human cells," which is published today.

Thousands of images of frozen bacteria

How do bacteria sense and adapt to their environment? Ariane Briegel, Professor of Ultrastructural Biology, is intrigued by this question. Using new techniques, she produces three-dimensional images of bacteria that provide us with new clues about their sensory system.

Fellowship aims to protect threatened Australian night parrots

Ensuring one of Australia's most high-profile threatened bird species does not disappear a second time is the mission of a University of Queensland researcher.


This email is a free service of Science X Network
You received this email because you subscribed to our list.
If you no longer want to receive this email use the link below to unsubscribe.
https://sciencex.com/profile/nwletter/
You are subscribed as jmabs1@gmail.com

1 comment:

Elena Walter said...

I am a 40-year-old. My Hepatitis B (HBV) disease appeared at the age of 34, with no hope of a cure from the hospital i looked further for an alternative treatments, a friend of mine told me about Health Herbal Clinic in Nigeria who sell herbal treatments for diseases including Hepatitis B disease, I contacted the herbal clinic via their website and purchased the HBV herbal remedy. I received the herbal remedy through DHL couriers within 8 days and i immediately commenced usage as prescribed, i used the herbal remedy for about a month and 1 week, my condition has greatly improved, all my symptoms including Abdominal pain, Nausea and vomiting, Loss of appetite, I am HBV free! contact Health Herbal Clinic via their email draribaspelltemple@gmail.com or visit https://m.facebook.com/greatdrariba.. PLS HBV is not a death sentence, there is a cure!
Whatsapp: +2348140439497