Friday, February 17, 2017

Science X Newsletter Friday, Feb 17

Dear Reader ,

Here is your customized Science X Newsletter for February 17, 2017:

Spotlight Stories Headlines

One-of-a-kind? Or not. USU evolutionary biologist studies formation of new species

Can facial recognition systems help save lemurs?

'Lossless' metamaterial could boost efficiency of lasers and other light-based devices

N. Zealand part of sunken 'lost continent': scientists

Six-legged robots faster than nature-inspired gait

NIST quest for climate-friendly refrigerants finds complicated choices

Local weather impacts melting of one of Antarctica's fastest-retreating glaciers

Liquid metal nano printing set to revolutionize electronics

Apple patent for display panel with IR diodes refuels rumor mill over next iPhone

Music makers can enjoy an A.I. Duet

Contact tracing, with indoor spraying, can curb dengue outbreak

Team tracks rare T cells in blood to better understand annual flu vaccine

Better explaining the world around us

How NASA's Cassini Saturn mission found a new target in the search for habitable worlds beyond Earth

Father's diet impacts on son's ability to reproduce, study finds

Astronomy & Space news

How NASA's Cassini Saturn mission found a new target in the search for habitable worlds beyond Earth

On Feb. 17, 2005, NASA's Cassini spacecraft was making the first-ever close pass over Saturn's moon Enceladus as it worked through its detailed survey of the planet's icy satellites. Exciting, to be sure, just for the thrill of exploration. But then Cassini's magnetometer instrument noticed something odd.

Hubble spotlights a celestial sidekick

This image was captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), a highly efficient wide-field camera covering the optical and near-infrared parts of the spectrum. While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing—the object Hubble was actually studying at the time!

Minor planet named Bernard

A minor planet in the solar system will officially be known as Bernardbowen from today after Australian citizen science project theSkyNet won a competition to name the celestial body.

Moonshot pad roaring back into action with SpaceX launch

The launch pad used to send Americans to the moon and shuttle astronauts into orbit is roaring back into action.

NASA selects proposals for first-ever space technology research institutes

NASA has selected proposals for the creation of two multi-disciplinary, university-led research institutes that will focus on the development of technologies critical to extending human presence deeper into our solar system.

Technology news

Six-legged robots faster than nature-inspired gait

When vertebrates run, their legs exhibit minimal contact with the ground. But insects are different. These six-legged creatures run fastest using a three-legged, or "tripod" gait where they have three legs on the ground at all times - two on one side of their body and one on the other. The tripod gait has long inspired engineers who design six-legged robots, but is it necessarily the fastest and most efficient way for bio-inspired robots to move on the ground?

Apple patent for display panel with IR diodes refuels rumor mill over next iPhone

(Tech Xplore)—Heard all the rumors about the iPhone home button? Your future handset might have you groping for that home button that is no longer there, according to the rumors. And fingerprint scanners will go to work under the screen.

Music makers can enjoy an A.I. Duet

(Tech Xplore)—An artificial intelligence experiment has emerged of the most enjoyable kind: It is called "A.I. Duet."

Engineers design a bulletproof origami shield to protect law enforcement

BYU engineering professors have created an origami-inspired, lightweight bulletproof shield that can protect law enforcement from gunfire.

Particles from outer space are wreaking low-grade havoc on personal electronics

You may not realize it but alien subatomic particles raining down from outer space are wreaking low-grade havoc on your smartphones, computers and other personal electronic devices.

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

The cutting-edge biocompatible near-infrared 3D tracking system used to guide the suturing in the first smart tissue autonomous robot (STAR) surgery has the potential to improve manual and robot-assisted surgery and interventions through unobstructed 3D visibility and enhanced accuracy, according to a study published in the March 2017 issue of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering. The study successfully demonstrates feasibility in live subjects (in-vivo) and demonstrates 3D tracking of tissue and surgical tools with millimeter accuracy in ex-vivo tests. More accurate and consistent suturing helps reduce leakage, which can improve surgical outcomes.

Efficient power converter for internet of things

The "internet of things" is the idea that vehicles, appliances, civil structures, manufacturing equipment, and even livestock will soon have sensors that report information directly to networked servers, aiding with maintenance and the coordination of tasks.

Robot probes show Japan reactor cleanup worse than expected

Robot probes sent to one of Japan's wrecked Fukushima nuclear reactors have suggested worse-than-anticipated challenges for the plant's ongoing cleanup.

Samsung family succession hits snag with chief's arrest

South Korea was taken by surprise Friday with the arrest of the scion of the country's richest family and de-facto leader at Samsung over his alleged involvement in a massive corruption scandal that engulfed the president and riveted the nation.

System automatically detects cracks in nuclear power plants

A new automated system detects cracks in the steel components of nuclear power plants and has been shown to be more accurate than other automated systems.

Vizio's caught monitoring TV owners' viewing habits, selling info

Vizio was the first television maker to get caught and punished with a $2.2 million fine by the Federal Trade Commission and the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, for monitoring the viewing habits of its Smart TV set owners and selling the data to advertisers.

Net neutrality should be Silicon Valley's next fight

Silicon Valley is rightly focused on President Donald Trump's immigration order. But it should be gearing up for another fight that's vital to both tech companies and their customers.

One bot to rule them all? Not likely, with Apple, Google, Amazon and Microsoft virtual assistants

It's no wonder titans of tech are locked in an epic battle of the bots, racing furiously to produce the best virtual assistant.

Low-cost mobile carrier CEO finds his calling

The gig: David Glickman, 51, is co-founder and chief executive of Ultra Mobile, a prepaid mobile carrier that provides low-cost, no-contract SIM cards with a focus on immigrants living in the U.S. The company, headquartered outside Los Angeles, leases wireless telephone and data infrastructure from T-Mobile.

No time to run? Tsunami pod aims to save lives—at a price

When Jeanne Johnson lived in New Orleans, she figured out how to weather hurricanes. When the family moved to Kansas City, she taught her kids to take cover from tornadoes. So when Johnson recent bought a house on Washington state's Long Beach Peninsula - about 110 miles southwest of Seattle - she set out to improve her odds of surviving a Cascadia megaquake and tsunami.

Next generation batteries could provide power to microsatellites, CubeSats

Sometimes good things come in very small packages. Just ask Dr. Luke Roberson, senior principal investigator for Flight Research within the Exploration Research and Technology Directorate at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The design tricks that made the Nokia 3310 world-beating

The Nokia 3310 mobile phone has near iconic status. Released in 2000, it is among the best-selling phones of all time, with 126m units produced. It was renowned for being virtually indestructible and for launching many of us onto the first rung of our connected lifestyles. Many people in their 30s and upwards remember it as the first cool phone they owned, or the phone their friends had that made them jealous.

DRI unmanned cloud-seeding realizes beyond visual line of sight

Nevada's unmanned cloud-seeding research team has realized another fundamental capability in their effort toward enhancing snowfall in mountainous regions of the West.

Medicine & Health news

Contact tracing, with indoor spraying, can curb dengue outbreak

Contact tracing, combined with targeted, indoor residual spraying of insecticide, can greatly reduce the spread of the mosquito-borne dengue virus, finds a study led by Emory University.

Team tracks rare T cells in blood to better understand annual flu vaccine

For most vaccines to work the body needs two cell types - B cells and T helper cells - to make antibodies. B cells are the antibody factories and the T helper cells refine the strength and accuracy of antibodies to home and attack their targets. A technique that identifies these helper immune cells could inform future vaccine design, especially for vulnerable populations.

Study shows higher than expected sequencing errors in public databases

(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with New England Biolabs Inc. (NEB) has found that sequenced DNA samples held in public databases had higher than expected low-frequency mutation error rates. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they created an algorithm that is able to calculate an error rate for samples in a database and what it showed when run on two public genome databases.

How dads bond with toddlers: Brain scans link oxytocin to paternal nurturing

Fathers given boosts of the hormone oxytocin show increased activity in brain regions associated with reward and empathy when viewing photos of their toddlers, an Emory University study finds.

Discovery of genetic 'switch' could help to prevent symptoms of Parkinson's disease

A genetic 'switch' has been discovered by MRC researchers at the University of Leicester which could help to prevent or delay the symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

Researcher uses wearable devices to look for clues to early dementia and Alzheimer's

In 2014, more than 93,000 people in the United States died from Alzheimer's disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The complex nature of Alzheimer's makes it difficult to understand and predict, until it's too late. Boston University professor and neuropsychologist Rhoda Au is trying to change that. Through the use of wearable digital devices, Au is collecting an enormous amount of data on people over time with the hope of finding the minute physical changes that correspond with the slow mental decline of Alzheimer's.

Scientists uncover how Zika virus causes microcephaly

A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered the mechanisms that the Zika virus uses to alter brain development. These findings are detailed in Stem Cell Reports.

Is the human brain hardwired to appreciate poetry?

In 1932 T.S. Eliot famously argued, "Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood."

From mice, clues to microbiome's influence on metabolic disease

The community of microorganisms that resides in the gut, known as the microbiome, has been shown to work in tandem with the genes of a host organism to regulate insulin secretion, a key variable in the onset of the metabolic disease diabetes.

More evidence that Zika mRNA vaccines can stop viral replication in mice

Vaccine developers have successfully protected mice against Zika by injecting synthetic messenger RNA that encodes for virus proteins into the animals. The cells of the mice then build parts of the virus, training the immune system to recognize a future infection. The research, published February 17 in Cell, follows a February 2 Letter in Nature that showed similar positive results for a messenger RNA vaccine for Zika in mice and monkeys.

Online-only pharmacies that don't require prescriptions could fuel antibiotic resistance

The researchers from Imperial College London analysed 20 pharmacies that were available for UK citizens to access online. This is one of the few studies to have examined the online availability of antibiotics and to have explored the potential effects on public health. The research is published in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

Encouraging signs for potential new antibiotic

A study published online today in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, reveals strong evidence that the first in a new class of antibiotic is as effective as an established antimicrobial agent in the fight against infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Antibiotics could be alternative to surgery as treatment for appendicitis

A study by researchers at the University of Southampton shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery.

Are face transplants still research, or regular care?

Is replacing a severely disfigured person's face with one from a dead donor ready to be called regular care, something insurers should cover? Mayo Clinic has raised that question by doing the first U.S. face transplant that's not part of research.

Twin tragedies give survivor a new face - and a new life

He'd been waiting for this day, and when his doctor handed him the mirror, Andy Sandness stared at his image and absorbed the enormity of the moment: He had a new face, one that had belonged to another man.

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterial scourge. As its name suggests, MRSA is resistant to most common antibiotics and thus difficult to treat, particularly in children where it commonly causes complicated skin and skin structure infections.

Method developed by biomedical scientists could help in treatment of several diseases

In cells, DNA is first converted to RNA, and RNA is next converted to proteins—a complicated process involving several other steps. Nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) is a processing pathway in cells that, like a broom, cleans up erroneous RNA to prevent its productive conversion into an aberrant protein, which could lead to disease.

New analysis links 30,000 excess deaths in 2015 to cuts in health and social care

Researchers exploring why there has been a substantial increase in mortality in England and Wales in 2015 conclude that failures in the health and social care system linked to disinvestment are likely to be the main cause.

What the ability to 'get the gist' says about your brain

Many who have a chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) report struggling to solve problems, understand complex information and maintain friendships, despite scoring normally on cognitive tests. New research from the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas finds that a gist reasoning test, developed by clinicians and cognitive neuroscientists at the Center, is more sensitive than other traditional tests at identifying certain cognitive deficits.

Post-deployment screening with tailored advice does not help reduce mental health disorders in UK Armed Forces

Few Armed Forces personnel seek help for mental health disorders and novel approaches will be needed to encourage personnel at risk of PTSD, anxiety and alcohol abuse to seek treatment.

Consuming saturated animal fats increases the risk of type 2 diabetes

Recently, dietary guidelines for the general population have shifted toward a plant-based diet rich in legumes, whole-grain cereals, fruits, vegetables and nuts, and low in animal-based foods like red meat. Increasing evidence is suggesting that plant-based diets are beneficial for health and they also have a lower impact on the environment.

Scientists develop AI-based method to diagnose Alzheimer's or Parkinson's

Alzheimer's disease, which currently affects more than 40 million people, is the most common neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Early diagnosis is crucial both to treat the disease and to help the development of new medicines, as it hasn't been possible to find a cure so far. The development of Alzheimer's has been proven to be closely linked to both structural changes in gray matter and functional changes in the white matter connecting the regions of the brain. In the brain connectivity network, a significant loss of white matter fibers also causes functional alterations such as memory loss. However, diagnosis remains a challenge, and to date, it hasn't been possible to determine how functional cerebral activity contributes to the deterioration of structural activity and vice versa.

Experts warn of the need to control doping also in amateur athletes

A study led by the University of Granada (UGR) has shown that doping is not only a problem exclusive to professional sports, but also occurs in amateur sports

Molecular aid to insulin secretion identified

Blood sugar triggers the secretion of insulin from cells in the pancreas, a process that is impaired in diabetes. A team of Yale researchers have identified a mechanism at the membranes of these pancreatic cells that controls this fundamental function.

New method could fast-track existing drugs as novel treatments for depression

Research from King's College London reveals a new method of repurposing existing drugs as novel treatments for depression, using laboratory studies of brain cells.

Discovery of novel autophagy regulators for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

A research team led by Professor Li Min, Director of the Teaching and Research Division (CMTR), and Director of the Mr and Mrs Ko Chi Ming Centre for Parkinson's Disease Research under the School of Chinese Medicine (SCM) of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU), discovered a novel autophagy regulator for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The research team was granted a US patent for the study, and related findings were published in the prestigious academic journal Autophagy. The team will explore further collaboration with a potential biotechnology company in the hope of applying such knowledge in new drug development.

Getting to bed on time requires self-control with the remote control

If you created a schedule to watch television at night, chances are you're not postponing bedtime sleep.

Patients accurately self-report medical histories for most maladies

A study led by a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher found that a group of prostate cancer patients reliably reported their own medical histories when their responses were compared to their medical records. The findings suggest that patient-generated reports, which researchers argue are less costly than medical record audits, are a reasonable approach for researchers who are conducting observational comparative effectiveness studies.

Serious video games can help children with cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common childhood physical disability, affecting more than 34,000 Australians, and more than 17 million people worldwide.

The reasons for our left or right-handedness

It is not the brain that determines if people are right or left-handed, but the spinal cord. This has been inferred from the research results compiled by a team headed by private lecturer Dr Sebastian Ocklenburg, Judith Schmitz, and Prof Dr H. C. Onur Güntürkün. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and from South Africa, the biopsychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have demonstrated that gene activity in the spinal cord is asymmetrical already in the womb. A preference for the left or the right hand might be traced back to that asymmetry.

New technique yields healthier blood vessels after heart surgery

Surgeons often take a blood vessel from your leg to graft onto your heart during a coronary bypass surgery. The practice can lead to scarring in many patients, which in turn can cause another heart attack. A new technique under development may help prevent this problem.

New steps to individualize patients care

In the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Dr. Ralph Horwitz and colleagues outline new methodologies, in addition to the well-known randomized controlled trials, to gather information that may lead to individualized patient care.

How gut microbiome and diet can affect depression

An international group of researchers headed by André Carvalho has published in Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics a paper that provides new data and prospects for the links between the intestinal flora and several disorders, notably depression.

Personalised physical therapy brings relief for lower back pain

Impaired movement control may result in chronic lower back pain. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that the combination of manual therapy and exercise is an excellent way to combat movement control impairment in the lower back. This combination reduced the disability experienced by patients and significantly improved their functional ability. A personally tailored exercise programme was more beneficial for patients than a generic one, and the treatment results also persisted at a 12-month follow-up.

Could your Fitbit data be used to deny you health insurance?

Wearing a fitness tracking device could earn you cash from your health insurance company. At first, this sounds lucrative for the people who participate, and good for the companies, who want healthier insurance customers. But it's not quite so simple.

Protein and carb intake post-exercise can benefit bone health, study finds

Protein and carbohydrate intake after exercise can have a beneficial impact on bone health and could help to stave off serious injury among athletes, new research suggests.

Quality of life for patients with advanced cancer improved through walking

Walking for just 30 minutes three times per week could improve the quality of life for those with advanced cancer, a new study published in the BMJ Open journal has found.

Empathy and moral choices—study limits the role of emotions in moral decisions

Empathy and emotional awareness do not affect our moral decisions. This is suggested by a new study published on Social Neuroscience and led by SISSA neuroscientist Marilena Aiello. Our choices do not depend on our empathy. The difference, instead, lies in our emotional reactions, more pronounced in more empathic people. In particular if we opt for uncomfortable decisions for a greater good.

New research examines gun use, injury and fear in domestic violence

A weapon, whether a body part such as hands, fists and feet or an external instrument like a gun, often accompanies intimate-partner violence. Susan B. Sorenson of the University of Pennsylvania wanted to better understand just how frequently each type generally, and guns specifically, appeared in these cases.

Peer milk-sharing participants generally keep it clean

Mothers who want the benefits of breast milk for their babies but can't produce the substance often turn to milk-sharing networks.

New test may quickly identify mild traumatic brain injury with underlying brain damage

A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion, according to Peter J. Bergold, PhD, professor of physiology and pharmacology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and corresponding author of a study newly published online by the Journal of Neurotrauma.

Tumor suppressor promotes some acute myeloid leukemias, study reveals

Researchers in Germany have discovered that a tumor suppressor protein thought to prevent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can actually promote a particularly deadly form of the disease. The study, "RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce leukemia," which will be published online February 17 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this protein could be an effective treatment for certain AML patients.

Lingering baby weight? Don't blame the pregnancy

(HealthDay)—Women have long blamed pregnancy for weight gains that linger after their babies are born, but a new study suggests the demands of motherhood might be to blame.

Yeast found in babies' guts increases risk of asthma

University of British Columbia microbiologists have found a yeast in the gut of new babies in Ecuador that appears to be a strong predictor that they will develop asthma in childhood. The new research furthers our understanding of the role microscopic organisms play in our overall health.

Low level vitamin D during remission contributes to relapse in ulcerative colitis patients

A new study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that lower levels of vitamin D in the blood increase the risk of clinical relapse in patients with Ulcerative Colitis (UC), an inflammatory bowel disease that causes long-lasting inflammation and ulcers in the colon. The study was published in the February issue of the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Role of rogue protein PAK4 confirmed in pancreatic cancer cells

A new study that confirms the role of a protein called PAK4 in the movement and growth of pancreatic cancer cells could help researchers find new ways to tackle the disease.

Stem cells collected from fat may have use in anti-aging treatments

Adult stem cells collected directly from human fat are more stable than other cells - such as fibroblasts from the skin - and have the potential for use in anti-aging treatments, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. They made the discovery after developing a new model to study chronological aging of these cells. They published their findings this month in the journal Stem Cells.

Adaptable model recommends response strategies for Zika, other pandemics

The 2016 Zika virus outbreak, along with recent outbreaks of SARS, bird flu, H1N1 and Ebola, underscore the importance of being prepared for and responding quickly to infectious diseases. Zika, in particular, poses unique challenges, since its associated birth defects and lack of preventive treatment currently threaten over 60 countries.

For a fun and safe tropical getaway, plan ahead

(HealthDay)—If you're planning a tropical getaway, be sure to pack old standbys like bug spray and sunscreen—and maybe a lot more, a doctor advises.

Metformin use linked to less vitamin B12 measurement

(HealthDay)—Long-term metformin use is associated with lower serum vitamin B12 concentration, although metformin users are less likely to receive vitamin B12 testing, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Higher ASA class not tied to 30-day morbidity in spinal surgery

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing single-level elective anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (SLE-ACDF), higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification is not associated with 30-day morbidity, according to a study published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

ASCO: antibiotics may have negative impact in renal cancer

(HealthDay)—For patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics (ATBs) can reduce progression-free survival, according to research presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held from Feb. 16 to 18 in Orlando, Fla.

ASCO: alvimopan helpful for men undergoing testicular CA surgery

(HealthDay)—For men with testicular cancer undergoing retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), alvimopan may reduce hospital length of stay (LOS) and enhance gastrointestinal recovery, according to a study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held from Feb. 16 to 18 in Orlando, Fla.

Unipolar radiofrequency device safe, effective for face tightening

(HealthDay)—For subjects with facial laxity, a novel fractional unipolar radiofrequency (RF) device is safe and efficacious for facial tightening, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

ICU care for COPD, heart failure and heart attack may not be better

Does a stay in the intensive care unit give patients a better chance of surviving a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure flare-up or even a heart attack, compared with care in another type of hospital unit? Unless a patient is clearly critically ill, the answer may be no, according to University of Michigan researchers who analyzed more than 1.5 million Medicare records.

Tanzania stops 40 health centers from offering AIDS services

Tanzania's government has stopped 40 privately run health centers from providing AIDS-related services, accusing them of catering to homosexuals in a country where gay sex is criminalized.

Improved access to health information needed in rural communities

Raised in a rural farming community, Brad Hiebert knows full well accessing health-care services and general health information can sometimes be a challenge.

Biology news

One-of-a-kind? Or not. USU evolutionary biologist studies formation of new species

At what point on the journey along the branches of the evolutionary tree does a population become its own, unique species? And is a species still distinct, if it mates with a different, but closely related species? Evolutionary biologist Zach Gompert of Utah State University explores these questions and more, using plant-eating stick insects of the Timema genus as a research model.

Can facial recognition systems help save lemurs?

Facial recognition is a biometric system that identifies or verifies a person from a digital image. It's used to find criminals, identify passport and driver's license fraud, and catch shoplifters. But can it be used to identify endangered lemurs in the jungles of Madagascar?

Better explaining the world around us

A new University of Queensland-led study could help scientists more accurately predict and explain patterns of diversity in nature.

Father's diet impacts on son's ability to reproduce, study finds

New research involving Monash University biologists has debunked the view that males just pass on genetic material and not much else to their offspring. Instead, it found a father's diet can affect their son's ability to out-compete a rival's sperm after mating.

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) present a new method for controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. In the journal Nature Communications, the team, led by biomedical engineer Maarten Merkx, describes how it has developed the first DNA computer capable of detecting several antibodies in the blood and performing subsequent calculations based on this input. This is an important step toward the development of smart drugs for better delivery of medication for conditions such as rheumatism and Crohn's disease, with fewer side effects and at lower cost.

Melting polar ice, rising sea levels not only climate change dangers

Climate change from political and ecological standpoints is a constant in the media and with good reason, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist, but proof of its impact is sometimes found in unlikely places.

What happens to gene transcription during DNA damage?

It's well known that when the DNA in a cell is damaged, the cell responds by activating specific genes that help defend the integrity of its genome. But less well studied is the fact that the cell actually shuts down the vast majority of its other genes.

Moths found to produce their own antioxidants from carbohydrates

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from the University of Arizona and New Mexico State University has discovered how a species of moth is able to repair oxidative muscle damage without consuming antioxidants. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their study of the hawkmoth and how they discovered an adaption that allowed it to remain free of muscle damage. Carlos Martinez del Rio and Michael Dillon with the University of Wyoming offer a Perspective piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue and give some historical background to explain why some pollinators needed to develop an alternative means for protecting their muscles.

Congo river fish evolution shaped by intense rapids

New DNA-based research provides compelling evidence that a group of strange-looking fish living near the mouth of the Congo River are evolving due to the intense hydraulics of the river's rapids and deep canyons. The study, led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, the City University of New York, and Fordham University, reveals that fishes in this part of the river live in "neighborhoods" that are separated from one another by the waters' turbulent flow. In some cases, the researchers found that fishes living less than a mile away from their relatives are actually exchanging very few genes. Many represent distinct species, according to the new study now out in the journal Molecular Ecology.

Egg-free surrogate chickens produced in bid to save rare breeds

Hens that do not produce their own chicks have been developed for use as surrogates to lay eggs from rare breeds.

Researchers are first to see DNA 'blink'

Many of the secrets of cancer and other diseases lie in the cell's nucleus. But getting way down to that level—to see and investigate the important genetic material housed there—requires creative thinking and extremely powerful imaging techniques.

Nicaragua focuses on climate-change resistant coffee

With climate change threatening crops in many parts of the world, Nicaragua is turning to a robust variety of coffee bean to protect one of its key exports.

New guidance on hand-rearing decisions for endangered penguin chicks

The first model of its kind which provides guidance on the survival likelihood of abandoned penguin chicks admitted to rehabilitation has been developed by researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Exeter, Cape Town, the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (SANCCOB) and Bristol Zoological Society.

A novel socio-ecological approach to identifying suitable wolf habitats in human-dominated landscapes

About one third of the Swiss landscape offers suitable wolf habitat. Nonetheless, there is only a small fraction thereof where the wolf is tolerated by local communities. Those regions – characterized by both favourable environmental conditions and a positive attitude towards the wolf – are identified as candidate regions for the successful short to medium-term wolf expansion, according to a study conducted at the Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies of the University of Zurich

Mutilation and social determination of female Diacamma ants

Social insects, such as ants, bees and wasps, display an organizational complexity, called eusociality, where individual members of a colony act more like parts of a whole rather than independent organisms. In their colonies, each individual performs specific tasks based on which caste they belong to: either the reproductive caste or the worker caste. In many species, the reproductive role is determined in early development – by the time they are adults, queens and workers have set roles, complete with distinct appearances and functions. Remarkably, although ants, bees and wasps all evolved eusociality separately, all of their societies display this caste distinction. This begs the question: in these different organisms, have the same, or similar, genes evolved to differentiate social castes?

New life for 19th-century plants

Humans have long had a knack for concentrating heavy metals that would otherwise remain at low concentrations within the environment. These human-produced pollutants can be found going back as far as one million years ago with fires in caves during the Paleolithic Era, to industrial development in the 19th century, to increased concentrations of contaminants like cadmium and lead in the 20th century.

China closes live poultry markets amid deadly flu outbreak

China is ordering the closure of live poultry markets in its south-central regions as it grapples with the worst outbreak of bird flu in years that has killed at least 87 people.


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2 comments:

Unknown said...

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contact Dr Abumere herbal medicine via their email,abumereherbalcentre gmail com

Michelle Joe said...

I was told I had emphysema in 1987 when I was 45 years old. I smoked for 30 years, but quit smoking as soon as I was told that I had COPD. Quitting smoking was the hardest thing I ever did. But I knew I would die if I didn't. My health was getting so bad that I needed oxygen 24/7 and was down to 92lbs. Thankfully, in 1999 I got lung volume reduction surgery. It saved my life. I no longer needed oxygen and was able to climb stairs, dance, and travel the world. That good fortune lasted for almost 13 years. I am now back on oxygen 24/7 and can't climb stairs, dance or travel the world. i searched for alternative treatment Online i was introduced to Health herbal clinic by a friend here in the United states she told me they have successful herbal treatment to Emphysema and other lungs diseases. I spoke to few people who used the treatment here in USA and they all gave a positive response, so i immediately purchased the COPD herbal formula and commenced usage, its totally unexplainable how all the symptoms totally dissapeared, my cough was gone and i no longer experience shortness of breath(dyspnea), contact this herbal clinic via their email Info@ healthherbalclinic. net Or website www. healthherbalclinic. net Herbs are truely gift from God